CASE REPORTS
JOURNAL ARTICLE
RESEARCH SUPPORT, NON-U.S. GOV'T
RESEARCH SUPPORT, U.S. GOV'T, P.H.S.
REVIEW
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Review of antithyroid drug use during pregnancy and report of a case of aplasia cutis.

Thioamide therapy has improved the outcome of pregnancies complicated by maternal hyperthyroidism, without long-term effects on cognitive and somatic development. However, there remain questions concerning whether these drugs, especially methimazole (MMI), may be associated with aplasia cutis congenita (ACC) and how best to avoid impairment of fetal thyroid function during their use. We report an example of ACC and review the relevant literature. We conclude that there is insufficient evidence either to establish or eliminate a direct causal relationship between ACC and MMI use. Since propylthiouracil is an equally effective antithyroid agent and has not been associated with ACC, it is the preferred thioamide for hyperthyroidism during pregnancy. Our review also indicates that impairment of neonatal thyroid function may be minimized by using a thioamide dose that is just sufficient to maintain the maternal serum free thyroxine concentration in the high normal or slightly thyrotoxic range.

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