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Impact of sustained calorie restriction and weight cycling on body composition in high-fat diet-fed male and female C57BL/6J mice.

Obesity 2024 April 11
OBJECTIVE: The objective of this study was to investigate body composition changes with weight cycling (WC) among adult C57BL/6J mice with diet-induced obesity.

METHODS: A total of 555 single-housed mice were fed a high-fat diet ad libitum (AL) from 8 to 43 weeks of age. The 200 heaviest mice of each sex were randomized to the following four groups: ever obese (EO, continued AL feeding); obese weight loser (OWL, calorie-restricted); obese weight loser moderate (OWLM, body weight halfway between EO and OWL); and WC (diet restricted to OWL followed by AL refeeding cycles). Body weight and composition data were collected. Linear regression was used to calculate residuals between predicted and observed fat mass. Linear mixed models were used to compare diet groups.

RESULTS: Although weight loss and regain resulted in changes in body weight and composition, fat mass, body weight, and relative body fat were not significantly greater for the WC group compared with the EO group. During long-term calorie restriction, males (but not females) in the OWLM group remained relatively fatter than the EO group.

CONCLUSIONS: WC did not increase body weight or relative fat mass for middle-aged, high-fat diet-fed adult mice. However, long-term moderate calorie restriction resulted in lower body weight but greater "relative" fat in male mice.

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