CASE REPORTS
JOURNAL ARTICLE
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Two Cases of Periodic Paralysis Associated With MCM3AP Variants.

OBJECTIVES: Periodic paralysis is a rare genetic condition characterized by episodes of neuromuscular weakness, often provoked by electrolyte abnormalities, physiologic stress, physical exertion, and diet. In addition to mutations in genes coding for skeletal muscle ion channels, in 2019, Gustavasson et al discovered that the MCM3AP gene could be responsible for periodic paralysis. In this study, we present 2 individuals with clinical episodes of periodic paralysis who have variants in the MCM3AP gene.

METHODS: Two unrelated probands were independently evaluated with clinical, genetic, and electrodiagnostic testing.

RESULTS: Proband 1 is a 46-year-old man who presented with decades of ongoing episodic weakness and fatigue, clinically diagnosed with periodic paralysis and supported by electrodiagnostic studies. Proband 2 is a 34-year-old woman with a history of episodic paralysis since childhood. Genetic testing in both individuals revealed potentially pathogenic variants in the MCM3AP gene.

CONCLUSIONS: Periodic paralysis is a condition that significantly affects the lives of those diagnosed. The results illustrate that MCM3AP gene variants can been associated with a clinical and electrodiagnostic presentation of periodic paralysis. Additional future research should focus on clarifying any relationship between these genetic variants and the disease, as well as other possible genetic causes.

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