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The protective role of sesame oil against Parkinson's-like disease induced by manganese in rats.

Chronic exposure to manganese (Mn) results in motor dysfunction, biochemical and pathological alterations in the brain. Oxidative stress, inflammation, and dysfunction of dopaminergic and GABAergic systems stimulate activating transcription factor-6 (ATF-6) and protein kinase RNA-like ER kinase (PERK) leading to apoptosis. This study aimed to investigate the protective effect of sesame oil (SO) against Mn-induced neurotoxicity. Rats received 25 mg/kg MnCl2 and were concomitantly treated with 2.5, 5, or 8 ml/kg of SO for 5 weeks. Mn-induced motor dysfunction was indicated by significant decreases in the time taken by rats to fall during the rotarod test and in the number of movements observed during the open field test. Also, Mn resulted in neuronal degeneration as observed by histological staining. The striatal levels of lipid peroxides and reduced glutathione (oxidative stress markers), interleukin-6 and tumor necrosis factor-α (inflammatory markers) were significantly elevated. Mn significantly reduced the levels of dopamine and Bcl-2, while GABA, PERK, ATF-6, Bax, and caspase-3 were increased. Interestingly, all SO doses, especially at 8 ml/kg, significantly improved locomotor activity, biochemical deviations and reduced neuronal degeneration. In conclusion, SO may provide potential therapeutic benefits in enhancing motor performance and promoting neuronal survival in individuals highly exposed to Mn.

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