RESEARCH SUPPORT, NON-U.S. GOV'T
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Perventricular device closure of ventricular septal defects: six months results in 30 young children.

BACKGROUND: Both surgical repair and transcatheter closure of isolated ventricular septal defects are known to have limitations in children. This report describes the short-term results of perventricular device closure of nonmuscular ventricular septal defects without cardiopulmonary bypass in young children.

METHODS: Thirty patients who had nonmuscular ventricular septal defects underwent perventricular closure by minimally invasive technique without cardiopulmonary bypass. A subxiphoid minimally invasive incision was performed. Under the continuous guidance of transesophageal echocardiography, the free wall of the right ventricle was punctured and a guidewire was introduced into the left ventricle through the defect. A delivery sheath was advanced over the wire and through the defect into the left ventricle. The device was released.

RESULTS: Closure was successful in 27 patients (90%). There was no mortality or atrioventricular block perioperatively or during the entire follow-up period. Three patients developed incomplete right bundle branch blocks and seven patients developed new trace or mild tricuspid regurgitation after the closure. The mean hospital stay was 3.6 +/- 0.7 days (range, 3 to 5 days) and no patient needed any blood or blood products. Follow-up at 6 months showed that two of the three patients had persistent incomplete right bundle branch block and three of the seven patients had persistent closure-related trace or mild tricuspid regurgitation.

CONCLUSIONS: Perventricular device closure of isolated ventricular septal defects without cardiopulmonary bypass appeared to be safe and efficacious in selected young children. The outcomes of short-term follow-up are acceptable.

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