COMPARATIVE STUDY
JOURNAL ARTICLE
RESEARCH SUPPORT, NON-U.S. GOV'T
Add like
Add dislike
Add to saved papers

Correlation between K complex, periodic leg movements (PLM), and myoclonus during sleep in paraplegic adults before and after an acute physical activity.

Spinal Cord 1997 April
K complex is the characteristic wave of stage II of sleep. The relationship between periodic limb movements (PLM) and the restless legs syndrome (RLS), and the incidence of K complexes and alpha activity has been previously described. The aim of the present study was to evaluate the effect of an acute physical activity upon K complex, PLM, and myoclonus during sleep in individuals who were paraplegic. We evaluated 84 polysomnograms from 28 volunteers with a spinal cord injury at the level of T7-T12, obtained during three consecutive nights. On day 3, the volunteers were submitted to a test of maximum effort (manual cycloergometer, with the equipment Cybex Met 300, with a progressive load increase of 12.5 w, every 2 min). The analysis of the polysomnographic recordings showed a positive correlation between the incidence of K complex and limb movements on nights 1, 2 and 3. Similarly, a correlation between the incidence of K complex and myoclonus was observed on nights 1, 2 and 3. An increased incidence of the total K complex was seen on night 3, 36 h after the test maximum effort. Both total K complex and K complex/h were reduced on night 2, compared to basal recording (night 1). There was a reduction of sleep latency on night 2, whereas total sleeping time increased progressively on night 3, as well as REM phase on nights 2 and 3. These findings indicate that physical activity can effect or modulate the incidence of K complex and suggest that a positive correlation between PLM and K complex may occur in those who are paraplegic from a spinal cord injury. In conclusion, sleep can be consolidated after physical activity.

Full text links

We have located links that may give you full text access.
Can't access the paper?
Try logging in through your university/institutional subscription. For a smoother one-click institutional access experience, please use our mobile app.

Related Resources

Managing Alcohol Withdrawal Syndrome.Annals of Emergency Medicine 2024 March 26

For the best experience, use the Read mobile app

Mobile app image

Get seemless 1-tap access through your institution/university

For the best experience, use the Read mobile app

All material on this website is protected by copyright, Copyright © 1994-2024 by WebMD LLC.
This website also contains material copyrighted by 3rd parties.

By using this service, you agree to our terms of use and privacy policy.

Your Privacy Choices Toggle icon

You can now claim free CME credits for this literature searchClaim now

Get seemless 1-tap access through your institution/university

For the best experience, use the Read mobile app