JOURNAL ARTICLE
REVIEW

Nerve transfer to deltoid muscle using the nerve to the long head of the triceps, part II: a report of 7 cases

Somsak Leechavengvongs, Kiat Witoonchart, Chairoj Uerpairojkit, Phairat Thuvasethakul
Journal of Hand Surgery 2003, 28 (4): 633-8
12877852

PURPOSE: This study reports the results of nerve transfer to the deltoid muscle using the nerve to the long head of the triceps.

METHODS: Seven patients with an average age of 25 years with loss of shoulder abduction secondary to upper brachial plexus injuries had nerve transfer using the nerve to the long head of the triceps to the anterior branch(es) of the axillary nerve through the posterior approach. The spinal accessory nerve was used simultaneously for nerve transfer to the suprascapular nerve. The follow-up period ranged from 18 to 28 months (average, 20 mo).

RESULTS: All patients recovered deltoid power against resistance (M4) at the last follow-up evaluation. Useful functional recovery was achieved in all 7 patients; 5 had excellent recoveries and 2 had good results. The average shoulder abduction was 124 degrees. No notable weakness of elbow extension was observed.

CONCLUSIONS: This method is a reliable and effective procedure for deltoid reconstruction in brachial plexus injury (upper-arm type) and should be combined with spinal accessory nerve transfer to the suprascapular nerve to obtain good shoulder abduction.

Full Text Links

Find Full Text Links for this Article

Discussion

You are not logged in. Sign Up or Log In to join the discussion.

Trending Papers

Remove bar
Read by QxMD icon Read
12877852
×

Save your favorite articles in one place with a free QxMD account.

×

Search Tips

Use Boolean operators: AND/OR

diabetic AND foot
diabetes OR diabetic

Exclude a word using the 'minus' sign

Virchow -triad

Use Parentheses

water AND (cup OR glass)

Add an asterisk (*) at end of a word to include word stems

Neuro* will search for Neurology, Neuroscientist, Neurological, and so on

Use quotes to search for an exact phrase

"primary prevention of cancer"
(heart or cardiac or cardio*) AND arrest -"American Heart Association"