CASE REPORTS
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[Hand-foot-mouth syndrome recurring during common variable deficiency].

BACKGROUND: Common variable immunodeficiency is characterized by hypogammaglobulinemia and recurrent bacterial infections. More uncommonly, these patients develop chronic enterovirus infectious meningoencephalitis. Recurrent enterovirus skin infection has not been reported to date in subjects with common variable immunodeficiency.

CASE REPORT: A 26-year-old man had suffered repeated episodes of otorhinolaryngological and pulmonary infections since childhood. He experienced three episodes of vesicular cutaneous eruption involving the palms of both hands, the plantar aspect of the feet and the buccal mucosa. The patient was hospitalized in March 1995 at the third episode. Temperature was 38 degrees C. He had maculopapulous and vesicular eruptions on the palm of the hands and plantar aspect of the feet with irritation in some areas. Petichial lesions were seen on the palate. PCR demonstrated viral DNA and cell cultures of a lesion biopsy were positive for enterovirus. Gammaglobulinemia was 4 g/l with low B cell count.

DISCUSSION: Viral infections are uncommon in patients with common variable immunodeficiency as cellular immunity remains normal. Severe viral infections caused by enteroviruses have however been reported, generally associating chronic, and generally fatal, meningoencephalitis. Our case would be the first case of a recurrent hand, foot and mouth disease in such patients.

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