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Abnormal Amygdala Subregion Functional Connectivity in Patients with Crohn's Disease with or without Anxiety and Depression.

OBJECTIVE: The aim of this study was to explore the resting-state functional connectivity (rsFC) of amygdala subregions in healthy controls (HCs) and in patients with Crohn's disease (CD) both with and without anxiety or depression.

MATERIALS AND METHODS: A total of 33 patients with CD and with anxiety or depression (CDad group), 31 patients with CD but without anxiety or depression (CDnad group), and 29 age-, sex-, and education level-matched HCs underwent functional magnetic resonance imaging. rsFC analysis was used to analyze the FC between the amygdala subregions and other areas of the brain.

RESULTS: Compared with the HC group, the CDad group demonstrated decreased rsFC between the right laterobasal subregion and the left hippocampus ( P < .001) and right middle frontal gyrus ( P < .001) and between the left superficial subregion and the left insula ( P < .001). Compared with the HC group, the CDnad group demonstrated decreased rsFC between the left centromedial subregion and the left insula ( P < .001). Compared with the CDnad group, the CDad group demonstrated decreased rsFC between the left centromedial subregion and the right precuneus ( P < .001) and postcentral gyrus ( P < .001), between the right laterobasal subregion and the left hippocampus ( P < .001), and between the left superficial subregion and the right middle frontal gyrus ( P < .001).

CONCLUSIONS: There are significant FC changes in the amygdala subregions in patients with CD. These changes may be related to the disease itself or to the symptoms of anxiety and depression.

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