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Resolvin and lipoxin metabolism network regulated by Hyssopus Cuspidatus Boriss extract in asthmatic mice.

Resolvin (Rv) and lipoxin (Lx) play important regulative roles in the development of several inflammation-related diseases. The dysregulation of their metabolic network is believed to be closely related to the occurrence and development of asthma. The Hyssopus Cuspidatus Boriss extract (SXCF) has long been used as a treatment for asthma, while the mechanism of anti-inflammatory and anti-asthma action targeting Rv and Lx has not been thoroughly investigated. In this study, we aimed to investigate the effects of SXCF on Rv, Lx in ovalbumin (OVA)-sensitized asthmatic mice. The changes of Rv, Lx before and after drug administration were analyzed based on high sensitivity chromatography-multiple response monitoring (UHPLC-MRM) analysis and multivariate statistics. The pathology exploration included behavioral changes of mice, IgE in serum, cytokines in BALF, and lung tissue sections stained with H&E. It was found that SXCF significantly modulated the metabolic disturbance of Rv, Lx due to asthma. Its modulation effect was significantly better than that of dexamethasone and rosmarinic acid which is the first-line clinical medicine and the main component of Hyssopus Cuspidatus Boriss, respectively. SXCF is demonstrated to be a potential anti-asthmatic drug with significant disease-modifying effects on OVA-induced asthma. The modulation of Rv and Lx is a possible underlying mechanism of the SXCF effects.

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