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Pilot study of an endoluminal-suturing device as a treatment for patients with gastroesophageal reflux disease.

Background and study aims Endoscopic therapy is a promising option for patients with gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD). The aim of this study was to assess safety and feasibility of the Endomina suturing platform as a treatment for GERD. Patients and methods This was a two-center study of patients with chronic GERD symptoms that responded at least partially to proton pump inhibitors (PPIs). Primary endpoints were to assess the safety of the procedure and persistence of the sutures. Secondary endpoints were to assess esophageal pH-impedance and manometry parameters changes at 6 months, as well as GERD symptoms and PPI use up to 12 months of follow-up. Results Fourteen patients were treated (13 males, mean of 43±12 years), with a mean number of three plications per patient. Thirteen, 10, and nine patients were analyzed at 3, 6, and 12 months of follow-up, respectively. One device-related adverse event occurred (loss of needle tip requiring endoscopic retrieval 1 week later). A mean of two plications persisted at 3 and 12 months. A decrease in median acid exposure time and reflux episodes was observed after the procedure. Mean Reflux Symptom Index and GERD-Health-Related Quality of Life scores decreased during follow-up visits and 90% of the patients discontinued PPI use at 1 year. Conclusions Endoscopic full-thickness suturing of the esophagogastric junction with the Endomina suturing platform is feasible, allowing persistence of two-thirds of the plications, with promising results for decreasing reflux and improving GERD symptoms.

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