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Investigation of the molecular genetic causes of non-syndromic primary ovarian ınsufficiency by next generation sequencing analysis.

OBJECTIVE: The aim of this study is to investigate the molecular genetic causes of non-syndromic primary ovarian insufficiency (POI) cases with the gene panel basedon next generation sequencing analysis and to establish the relationship between genotype and phenotype.

MATERIALS AND METHODS: Twenty three cases aged 14-40 years followed up with POI were included. Patients with a karyotype of 46, XX, primary or secondary amenorrhea before the age of 40, with elevated FSH (>40 IU/mL) and low AMH levels (<0.03 ng/mL) were included in the study. Molecular genetic analyzes were performed by the next generation sequencing analysis method targeted with the TruSight TM Exome panel.

RESULTS: Median age of the cases was 17.8 (14.0-24.3) years, and 12 (52%) cases admitted before the age of 18. Fifteen (65%) patients had consanguineous parents. In2 (8.6%) cases, variants detected were in genes that have been previously proven to cause POI. One was homozygous variant in FIGLA gene and the other was homozygous variant in PSMC3IP gene. Heterozygous variants were detected in PROK2, WDR11 and CHD7 associated with hypogonadotropic hypogonadism, but these variants are insufficient to contribute to the POI phenotype.

CONCLUSION: Genetic panels based on next generation sequencing analysis technologies can be used to determine the molecular genetic diagnosis of POI, which has a highly heterogeneous genetic basis.

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