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Bacterial community structure in the rhizosphere of fungi-infected Amorphophallus titanum.

The rhizosphere is a narrow soil area directly affected by plant root exudates. Microbes inhabiting the rhizosphere have been widely studied for their beneficial effects on plant nutrition, growth, and disease prevention. Many factors affect the rhizosphere microbial composition, including plant pathogen infection. Here, we analyzed the bacterial community structure in the rhizosphere of fungi-infected Amorphophallus titanum. Soil samples were collected from rhizosphere and non-rhizosphere areas of fungi-infected A. titanum. The 16S-metagenomic analysis was conducted to investigate the bacterial community of the samples by amplifying the V3-V4 region. The results showed that the phylum Firmicutes was prevalent in the rhizosphere, whereas the phyla Proteobacteria, Acidobacteria, and Actinobacteria were limited. Some major fungal genera were isolated from infected tubers and rhizosphere soil of A. titanum, including Trichoderma sp., Aspergillus sp., Perenniporia sp., and Cerrena sp.. The fungal isolate Aspergillus spp. is a well-known agricultural pest in several reports. While Cerrena sp. was reported to be pathogenic in plants including the family of Arecaceae. Overall, the data revealed a potential relationship between fungal infections and the dominant bacterial community in the rhizosphere of A. titanum. Additionally, this research may contribute to the development of microbe-based technology to mitigate diseases in A. titanum.

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