JOURNAL ARTICLE
RESEARCH SUPPORT, NON-U.S. GOV'T
REVIEW
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Malnourished Microbes: Host-Microbiome Interactions in Child Undernutrition.

Childhood undernutrition is a major global health burden that is only partially resolved by nutritional interventions. Both chronic and acute forms of child undernutrition are characterized by derangements in multiple biological systems including metabolism, immunity, and endocrine systems. A growing body of evidence supports a role of the gut microbiome in mediating these pathways influencing early life growth. Observational studies report alterations in the gut microbiome of undernourished children, while preclinical studies suggest that this can trigger intestinal enteropathy, alter host metabolism, and disrupt immune-mediated resistance against enteropathogens, each of which contribute to poor early life growth. Here, we compile evidence from preclinical and clinical studies and describe the emerging pathophysiological pathways by which the early life gut microbiome influences host metabolism, immunity, intestinal function, endocrine regulation, and other pathways contributing to child undernutrition. We discuss emerging microbiome-directed therapies and consider future research directions to identify and target microbiome-sensitive pathways in child undernutrition.

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