JOURNAL ARTICLE
Add like
Add dislike
Add to saved papers

Phenobarbital Versus Lorazepam for Management of Alcohol Withdrawal Syndrome: A Retrospective Cohort Study.

Curēus 2021 Februrary 12
Introduction  Annually, 500,000 episodes of alcohol withdrawal syndrome (AWS) are severe enough to require clinical attention. A symptom-triggered lorazepam regimen remains the standard of care for the management of hospitalized AWS patients. However, phenobarbital has also been shown to be an effective adjunctive therapy for severe AWS, reducing benzodiazepine use in the emergency department (ED) and the intensive care unit (ICU). The purpose of this study is to compare hospital length of stay (LOS) for AWS patients using phenobarbital-based versus lorazepam-based treatment protocols as monotherapy for management of AWS on general medical units. Methods This is a retrospective cohort study over a two-year period (March, 2016 to March, 2018), conducted at three hospitals within the St. Joseph Mercy Health System. We included 606 patients with a primary diagnosis of AWS or alcohol intoxication who met our inclusion criteria (543 in the lorazepam cohort and 63 in the phenobarbital cohort). Adjusted comparisons were done using propensity scoring methods. Hospital LOS was set as the primary outcome. Secondary outcomes included all-cause 30-day readmission, alcohol-related 30-day readmission, 30-day ED visits after discharge, and need for ICU transfer during hospital stay. Results Patients who received phenobarbital had a statistically significant shorter hospital LOS as compared to patients who received lorazepam (2.8 versus 3.6 days, P < 0.001). Furthermore, the phenobarbital treatment group had statistically significant lower rates of all-cause 30-day readmission (11.11% versus 14.18%, P = 0.020) and 30-day ED visits after discharge (11.11% versus 18.6%, P = 0.015). No statistical significance was detected for alcohol-related 30-day readmission and the need for ICU transfer between the treatment groups. Conclusion This study suggests that phenobarbital may be a reasonable alternative to lorazepam in the management of AWS patients admitted to general medical units. Larger scale, well-executed, and adequately powered prospective studies and randomized controlled trials are needed to corroborate these findings.

Full text links

For the best experience, use the Read mobile app

Group 7SearchHeart failure treatmentPapersTopicsCollectionsEffects of Sodium-Glucose Cotransporter 2 Inhibitors for the Treatment of Patients With Heart Failure Importance: Only 1 class of glucose-lowering agents-sodium-glucose cotransporter 2 (SGLT2) inhibitors-has been reported to decrease the risk of cardiovascular events primarily by reducingSeptember 1, 2017: JAMA CardiologyAssociations of albuminuria in patients with chronic heart failure: findings in the ALiskiren Observation of heart Failure Treatment study.CONCLUSIONS: Increased UACR is common in patients with heart failure, including non-diabetics. Urinary albumin creatininineJul, 2011: European Journal of Heart FailureRandomized Controlled TrialEffects of Liraglutide on Clinical Stability Among Patients With Advanced Heart Failure and Reduced Ejection Fraction: A Randomized Clinical Trial.Review

Get seemless 1-tap access through your institution/university

For the best experience, use the Read mobile app

Read by QxMD is copyright © 2021 QxMD Software Inc. All rights reserved. By using this service, you agree to our terms of use and privacy policy.

Get seemless 1-tap access through your institution/university

For the best experience, use the Read mobile app