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Surgical efficacy analysis of tarsal tunnel syndrome: a retrospective study of 107 patients.

Tarsal tunnel syndrome (TTS) is an entrapment neuropathy of the posterior tibial nerve or its terminal branches compressed by its fibro-osseous tunnel beneath the flexor retinaculum on the medial side of the ankle. The current study was a retrospective study of 107 cases of patients with TTS, in which the onset characteristics were summarized, the factors that might affect the surgical treatment effects of TTS were discussed and analyzed. The syndrome diagnoses and treatment experiences of TTS were extracted and analyzed. In our cohort, TTS was more often found in middle-aged and older women. And the medial plantar nerve bundle was the most frequently affected nerve structure. The efficacy of surgical treatment were correlated to the causes of the disease, involved nerve bundles, methods of operation, and whether neurolysis of the epineurium was performed. Neurolysis of the epineurium is was recommended for patients with an enlarged tibial nerve due to impingement. The Singh method was recommended to release the tibial nerve and its branches. Patients with negative preoperative EMG results should carefully be cautious when considering their decision to undergo surgical treatment.

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