JOURNAL ARTICLE
MULTICENTER STUDY
RANDOMIZED CONTROLLED TRIAL
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Long-term efficacy and safety of two doses of Norditropin ® (somatropin) in Noonan syndrome: a 4-year randomized, double-blind, multicenter trial in Japanese patients.

Endocrine Journal 2020 August 29
This 4-year randomized, double-blind, multicenter trial (NCT01927861) investigated the long-term efficacy and safety of Norditropin® (NN-220; somatropin) in Japanese children with short stature due to Noonan syndrome. Pre-pubertal children with Noonan syndrome were randomized 1:1 to receive 0.033 mg/kg/day (n = 25, mean age 6.57 years) or 0.066 mg/kg/day (n = 26, mean age 6.06 years) GH. Height standard deviation score (SDS) change after 208 weeks from baseline was evaluated using an analysis of covariance model. Height SDS improved from -3.24 at baseline with a significantly greater increase (estimated mean [95% confidence interval]) with 0.066 vs. 0.033 mg/kg/day GH (1.84 [1.58; 2.10] vs. 0.85 [0.59; 1.12]; estimated mean difference 0.99 [0.62; 1.36]; p < 0.0001). The majority of treatment-emergent adverse events (TEAEs) were non-serious, mild and assessed as unlikely treatment-related. TEAE rates and frequencies of serious TEAEs were similar between groups. Three patients receiving 0.066 mg/kg/day were withdrawn; two due to TEAEs at days 1,041 and 1,289. Mean insulin-like growth factor-I SDS increased from -1.71 to -0.75 (0.033 mg/kg/day) and 0.57 (0.066 mg/kg/day) (statistically significant difference). In both groups, there were only minor glycosylated hemoglobin changes, similar oral glucose tolerance test insulin response increases and no clinically relevant changes in oral glucose tolerance test blood glucose, vital signs, electrocardiogram or transthoracic echocardiography. In conclusion, treatment with 0.033 and 0.066 mg/kg/day GH for 208 weeks improved height SDS in Japanese children with short stature due to Noonan syndrome with a significantly greater increase with 0.066 vs. 0.033 mg/kg/day GH and was well tolerated, with no new safety concerns.

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