MENU ▼
Read by QxMD icon Read
search
OPEN IN READ APP
JOURNAL ARTICLE

A case-control study investigating factors of preoperative delay in emergency laparotomy

Crispin Schneider, Laura E Tyler, Eleanor F Scull, Belinda J Pryle, Hugh Barr
International Journal of Surgery 2015, 22: 131-5
26318501

BACKGROUND: Emergency laparotomy (EL) is a procedure that puts a strain on healthcare resources and is associated with a significant morbidity and mortality. Despite these implications little improvement in the outcome of patients undergoing this procedure has been made in the UK over the last few decades. A delay in transferring patients to theatre has been shown to negatively affect outcome of EL. A prospective case-control study was carried out to evaluate which preoperative factors may contribute towards a delay in theatre transfer.

METHODS: The time between decision to operate and anaesthetic start time was recorded for all patients undergoing EL between April and September 2013 at Gloucestershire Royal Infirmary. Patient selection criteria were based on the National Emergency Laparotomy Audit guidelines. Patients were divided into two groups depending on whether the transfer to theatre was delayed or not. Binary logistic regression analysis was performed on perioperative factors to determine independent predictors of delay.

RESULTS: A total of 84 EL were included for analyses with 31 classified as delayed. In the delayed group time for theatre transfer was increased at 6.9 vs. 2.3 h (p < 0.005) respectively. Unavailability of emergency theatres due to other cases taking priority was the most frequent cause for delay (n = 24). On binary logistic regression analysis, indication for laparotomy (OR 4.96, CI 1.4-17.6, p < 0.05), patient age (OR 1.04, CI 1.00-1.07, p < 0.04) and presence of a consultant surgeon (OR 0.16, CI 0.03-0.79, p < 0.03) were found to be independent predictors of delay in EL.

CONCLUSION: In this study, factors that were associated with a delay in commencing EL were operative indication and patient age whereas the presence of a consultant surgeon made a delay less likely. These findings may highlight points of interest for researchers analysing and auditing the provision of EL in the UK.

Comments

You need to log in or sign up for an account to be able to comment.

No comments yet, be the first to post one!

Related Papers

Available on the App Store

Available on the Play Store
Remove bar
Read by QxMD icon Read
26318501
×

Search Tips

Use Boolean operators: AND/OR

diabetic AND foot
diabetes OR diabetic

Exclude a word using the 'minus' sign

Virchow -triad

Use Parentheses

water AND (cup OR glass)

Add an asterisk (*) at end of a word to include word stems

Neuro* will search for Neurology, Neuroscientist, Neurological, and so on

Use quotes to search for an exact phrase

"primary prevention of cancer"
(heart or cardiac or cardio*) AND arrest -"American Heart Association"