JOURNAL ARTICLE

Midterm outcome of stapled transanal rectal resection for obstructed defecation syndrome: a single-institution experience in China

Bin Zhang, Jian-Hua Ding, Yu-Juan Zhao, Meng Zhang, Shu-Hui Yin, Ying-Ying Feng, Ke Zhao
World Journal of Gastroenterology: WJG 2013 October 14, 19 (38): 6472-8
24151367

AIM: To assess midterm results of stapled transanal rectal resection (STARR) for obstructed defecation syndrome (ODS) and predictive factors for outcome.

METHODS: From May 2007 to May 2009, 75 female patients underwent STARR and were included in the present study. Preoperative and postoperative workup consisted of standardized interview and physical examination including proctoscopy, colonoscopy, anorectal manometry, and defecography. Clinical and functional results were assessed by standardized questionnaires for the assessment of constipation constipation scoring system (CSS), Longo's ODS score, and symptom severity score (SSS), incontinence Wexner incontinence score (WS), quality of life Patient Assessment of Constipation-Quality of Life Questionnaire (PAC-QOL), and patient satisfaction visual analog scale (VAS). Data were collected prospectively at baseline, 12 and 30 mo.

RESULTS: The median follow-up was 30 mo (range, 30-46 mo). Late postoperative complications occurred in 11 (14.7%) patients. Three of these patients required procedure-related reintervention (one diverticulectomy and two excision of staple granuloma). Although the recurrence rate was 10.7%, constipation scores (CSS, ODS score and SSS) significantly improved after STARR (P < 0.0001). Significant reduction in ODS symptoms was matched by an improvement in the PAC-QOL and VAS (P < 0.0001), and the satisfaction index was excellent in 25 (33.3%) patients, good in 23 (30.7%), fairly good in 14 (18.7%), and poor in 13 (17.3%). Nevertheless, the WS increased after STARR (P = 0.0169). Incontinence was present or deteriorated in 8 (10.7%) patients; 6 (8%) of whom were new onsets. Univariate analysis revealed that the occurrence of fecal incontinence (preoperative, postoperative or new-onset incontinence; P = 0.028, 0.000, and 0.007, respectively) was associated with the success of the operation.

CONCLUSION: STARR is an acceptable procedure for the surgical correction of ODS. However, its impact on symptomatic recurrence and postoperative incontinence may be problematic.

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