JOURNAL ARTICLE
Add like
Add dislike
Add to saved papers

Inflamation of the testis and epidididymis in an otherwise healthy child: is it a true bacterial urinary tract infection?

PURPOSE: The exact etiology of acute gonadal inflamation (EO) in children is unknown. Bacterial infection and underlying urological abnormalities are thought to be the main causes, and hence antibiotic treatment and further invasive urinary tract imaging studies are usually recommended. The purpose of this study was to assess the role of bacterial infection in pediatric acute EO.

MATERIALS AND METHODS: We retrospectively searched our electronic medical archive for children under the age of 18 years with the diagnosis of acute EO between 1997 and 2002. Patients' charts were retrieved and reviewed for clinical and laboratory data.

RESULTS: During 1997-2002, 193 patients with acute EO were treated. There were two subgroups according to the results of urinary cultures: 182 children (94.3%) had negative urine cultures and 11 (5.7%) had positive cultures. In the negative culture group the mean age was 9.8+/-3.2 years (0.5-17). Medical history for urological disease was negative in all patients. Presenting symptom was scrotal pain in 165 (90.7%), and only three patients (1.6%) had accompanying urinary symptoms. Physical examination was normal besides tender gonad. Urinalysis was completely normal in 169 (92.9%) patients. Scrotal Doppler ultrasound (US) demonstrated non-specific inflammatory process in 146 patients (80%), in nine (5%) torsion of the appendix testis was documented and in 27 (14.8%) scrotal US was normal. Follow up was available in 40% all of whom had an uneventful recovery with normal physical examination. In the positive culture group of 11 patients, the mean age was 11+/-6.7 years (3 months to 16 years), and eight patients (73%) had a known congenital urological abnormality. Presenting symptom was pain in five (45.4%) and pain with swelling in six (55.6%). Accompanying dysuria, frequency and urgency occurred in eight (72.7%) patients. Urinalysis was abnormal in 10 (90.9%). US demonstrated increased blood flow to the gonad in 10 (90.9%).

CONCLUSIONS: Negative history for urological disease, absence of urinary symptoms and normal urinalysis make the diagnosis of bacterial EO unlikely. In this setting, once testicular torsion was excluded, there is no justification for antimicrobial treatment or further imaging of the urinary tract.

Full text links

For the best experience, use the Read mobile app

Group 7SearchHeart failure treatmentPapersTopicsCollectionsEffects of Sodium-Glucose Cotransporter 2 Inhibitors for the Treatment of Patients With Heart Failure Importance: Only 1 class of glucose-lowering agents-sodium-glucose cotransporter 2 (SGLT2) inhibitors-has been reported to decrease the risk of cardiovascular events primarily by reducingSeptember 1, 2017: JAMA CardiologyAssociations of albuminuria in patients with chronic heart failure: findings in the ALiskiren Observation of heart Failure Treatment study.CONCLUSIONS: Increased UACR is common in patients with heart failure, including non-diabetics. Urinary albumin creatininineJul, 2011: European Journal of Heart FailureRandomized Controlled TrialEffects of Liraglutide on Clinical Stability Among Patients With Advanced Heart Failure and Reduced Ejection Fraction: A Randomized Clinical Trial.Review

Get seemless 1-tap access through your institution/university

For the best experience, use the Read mobile app

Read by QxMD is copyright © 2021 QxMD Software Inc. All rights reserved. By using this service, you agree to our terms of use and privacy policy.

Get seemless 1-tap access through your institution/university

For the best experience, use the Read mobile app