JOURNAL ARTICLE
Add like
Add dislike
Add to saved papers

Aqueous shunts in glaucoma: a report by the American Academy of Ophthalmology.

Ophthalmology 2008 June
OBJECTIVE: To provide an evidence-based summary of commercially available aqueous shunts currently used in substantial numbers (Ahmed [New World Medical, Inc., Rancho Cucamonga, CA], Baerveldt [Advanced Medical Optics, Inc., Santa Ana, CA], Krupin [Eagle Vision, Inc, Memphis, TN], Molteno [Molteno Ophthalmic Ltd., Dunedin, New Zealand]) to control intraocular pressure (IOP) in various glaucomas.

METHODS: Seventeen previously published randomized trials, 1 prospective nonrandomized comparative trial, 1 retrospective case-control study, 2 comprehensive literature reviews, and published English language, noncomparative case series and case reports were reviewed and graded for methodologic quality.

RESULTS: Aqueous shunts are used primarily after failure of medical, laser, and conventional filtering surgery to treat glaucoma and have been successful in controlling IOP in a variety of glaucomas. The principal long-term complication of anterior chamber tubes is corneal endothelial failure. The most shunt-specific delayed complication is erosion of the tube through overlying conjunctiva. There is a low incidence of this occurring with all shunts currently available, and it occurs most frequently within a few millimeters of the corneoscleral junction after anterior chamber insertion. Erosion of the equatorial plate through the conjunctival surface occurs less frequently. Clinical failure of the various devices over time occurs at a rate of approximately 10% per year, which is approximately the same as the failure rate for trabeculectomy.

CONCLUSIONS: Based on level I evidence, aqueous shunts seem to have benefits (IOP control, duration of benefit) comparable with those of trabeculectomy in the management of complex glaucomas (phakic or pseudophakic eyes after prior failed trabeculectomies). Level I evidence indicates that there are no advantages to the adjunctive use of antifibrotic agents or systemic corticosteroids with currently available shunts. Too few high-quality direct comparisons of various available shunts have been published to assess the relative efficacy or complication rates of specific devices beyond the implication that larger-surface-area explants provide more enduring and better IOP control. Long-term follow-up and comparative studies are encouraged.

Full text links

For the best experience, use the Read mobile app

Group 7SearchHeart failure treatmentPapersTopicsCollectionsEffects of Sodium-Glucose Cotransporter 2 Inhibitors for the Treatment of Patients With Heart Failure Importance: Only 1 class of glucose-lowering agents-sodium-glucose cotransporter 2 (SGLT2) inhibitors-has been reported to decrease the risk of cardiovascular events primarily by reducingSeptember 1, 2017: JAMA CardiologyAssociations of albuminuria in patients with chronic heart failure: findings in the ALiskiren Observation of heart Failure Treatment study.CONCLUSIONS: Increased UACR is common in patients with heart failure, including non-diabetics. Urinary albumin creatininineJul, 2011: European Journal of Heart FailureRandomized Controlled TrialEffects of Liraglutide on Clinical Stability Among Patients With Advanced Heart Failure and Reduced Ejection Fraction: A Randomized Clinical Trial.Review

Get seemless 1-tap access through your institution/university

For the best experience, use the Read mobile app

Read by QxMD is copyright © 2021 QxMD Software Inc. All rights reserved. By using this service, you agree to our terms of use and privacy policy.

Get seemless 1-tap access through your institution/university

For the best experience, use the Read mobile app