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Clinics in Plastic Surgery

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https://read.qxmd.com/read/30851758/pediatric-craniofacial-surgery-state-of-the-craft
#1
EDITORIAL
Edward P Buchanan
No abstract text is available yet for this article.
April 2019: Clinics in Plastic Surgery
https://read.qxmd.com/read/30851757/pediatric-craniomaxillofacial-oncologic-reconstruction
#2
REVIEW
Robert F Dempsey, Daniel C Chelius, William C Pederson, Marco Maricevich, Amy L Dimachkieh, Michael E Kupferman, Howard L Weiner, Larry H Hollier, Edward P Buchanan
Reconstruction of defects of the head and face in the pediatric population requires special consideration for future growth, and at times temporization in anticipation for skeletal maturity followed by subsequent reoperation at an appropriate age. Additional challenges include more limited donor sites, smaller anastomoses, and unpredictable postoperative compliance compared with their adult counterparts. Nonetheless, successful composite bony and soft tissue, and isolated soft tissue defects in children are safely reconstructed using existing local tissue and microsurgical techniques...
April 2019: Clinics in Plastic Surgery
https://read.qxmd.com/read/30851756/pierre-robin-sequence
#3
REVIEW
Sun T Hsieh, Albert S Woo
Pierre Robin sequence consists of clinical triad of micrognathia, glossoptosis, and airway compromise with variable inclusion of cleft palate. Evaluation of airway obstruction includes physical examination, polysomnography for obstruction events, and a combination of nasoendoscopy and bronchoscopy to search for synchronous obstructive lesions. A multidisciplinary approach is required given the high rate of syndromic disease. Management of airway obstruction and feeding starts with nonsurgical maneuvers, such as prone and lateral positioning, nasopharyngeal stenting, and continuous positive airway pressure...
April 2019: Clinics in Plastic Surgery
https://read.qxmd.com/read/30851755/pediatric-facial-trauma
#4
REVIEW
Tom W Andrew, Roshan Morbia, H Peter Lorenz
Pediatric facial fracture management is often complex and demanding. The structure and topography of the pediatric craniofacial skeleton are profoundly different from the mature skull. Consequently, the pediatric facial skeleton responds differently to traumatic force. Although the incidence of pediatric facial trauma is higher than in the adult population, the incidence of facial fracture is significantly lower. The management in younger patients is often more conservative because of potential growth impairment...
April 2019: Clinics in Plastic Surgery
https://read.qxmd.com/read/30851754/parry-romberg-syndrome
#5
REVIEW
Kelly P Schultz, Elaine Dong, Tuan A Truong, Renata S Maricevich
Parry-Romberg syndrome, or progressive hemifacial atrophy, is a rare disorder of unknown etiology. Patients present with unilateral atrophy of skin that may progress to involve underlying fat, muscle, and osseocartilaginous structures. Neurologic complications are common. After self-limited disease stabilization, various reconstructive options may be used to restore patients' facial symmetry. Serial autologous fat grafting has shown favorable results in reconstruction of mild or moderate soft tissue deficiency, but free tissue transfer remains the treatment of choice for severe disease...
April 2019: Clinics in Plastic Surgery
https://read.qxmd.com/read/30851753/porous-polyethylene-ear-reconstruction
#6
REVIEW
Youssef Tahiri, John Reinisch
The use of a porous polyethylene implant covered with a well-vascularized fascial flap allows ear reconstruction at an early age (before school) with minimal morbidity and psychological trauma. Excellent outcomes with minimal morbidity can be obtained using this technique. This type of microtia reconstruction provides a more holistic approach because it is done at a younger age, in a single stage, as an outpatient and could address the functional hearing issues earlier.
April 2019: Clinics in Plastic Surgery
https://read.qxmd.com/read/30851752/craniofacial-microsomia
#7
REVIEW
Craig Birgfeld, Carrie Heike
Clinicians use different diagnostic terms for patients with underdevelopment of facial features arising from the embryonic first and second pharyngeal arches, including first and second branchial arch syndrome, otomandibular dysostosis, oculoauriculovertebral syndrome, and hemifacial microsomia. Craniofacial microsomia has become the preferred term. Although no diagnostic criteria for craniofacial microsomia exist, most patients have a degree of underdevelopment of the mandible, maxilla, ear, orbit, facial soft tissue, and/or facial nerve...
April 2019: Clinics in Plastic Surgery
https://read.qxmd.com/read/30851751/treacher-collins-syndrome
#8
REVIEW
Albaraa Aljerian, Mirko S Gilardino
Treacher Collins syndrome is a rare genetic disorder of craniofacial development with a highly variable phenotype. The disorder displays an intricate underlying dysmorphology. Affected patients may suffer life-threatening airway complications and functional difficulties involving sight, hearing, speech, and feeding. Deformation of facial structures produces a characteristic appearance that includes malar hypoplasia, periorbital soft tissue anomalies, maxillomandibular hypoplasia, and ear anomalies. Management requires a specialized craniofacial team, as comprehensive care starts at birth and may require life-long follow-up...
April 2019: Clinics in Plastic Surgery
https://read.qxmd.com/read/30851750/state-of-the-art-hypertelorism-management
#9
REVIEW
Sameer Shakir, Ian C Hoppe, Jesse A Taylor
Orbital hypertelorism represents lateralization of the orbits, meaning increased interorbital and outer orbital distances. Interorbital hypertelorism represents a failure of medial orbital wall medialization in the setting of normally positioned lateral orbital walls. The etiology and type of hypertelorism influence selection of an operative procedure, whereas the severity of deformity dictates surgical need. Choice of surgical procedure is dictated by anatomic considerations, such as degree of orbital hypertelorism, midfacial proportions, and occlusal status...
April 2019: Clinics in Plastic Surgery
https://read.qxmd.com/read/30851749/pediatric-cranioplasty
#10
REVIEW
Michael R Bykowski, Jesse A Goldstein, Joseph E Losee
Historically, the approach to pediatric cranioplasty has been largely extrapolated from the treatment of adults. More recently, however, the intricacies of pediatric cranial reconstruction have become better understood, and the surgical management has been refined contemporaneously. Each patient's cranial defect bears a unique set of challenges and, as such, the choice of cranioplasty technique must be tailored accordingly.
April 2019: Clinics in Plastic Surgery
https://read.qxmd.com/read/30851748/orthognathic-surgery-for-patients-with-cleft-lip-and-palate
#11
REVIEW
Andree-Anne Roy, Michael Alexander Rtshiladze, Kyle Stevens, John Phillips
Cleft orthognathic surgery is an important component of a comprehensive cleft care plan. Applying combined orthodontic and orthognathic treatment principles to a cohort of patients with cleft lip and palate raises many challenges not encountered in conventional orthognathic care. Cleft patients share a commonality in their midfacial anatomy that is characterized by a 3-dimensionally deficient maxilla. The residual sequelae of multiple previous surgeries along with dental differences and unhealed fistulae are considerations when embarking on treatment...
April 2019: Clinics in Plastic Surgery
https://read.qxmd.com/read/30851747/syndromic-craniosynostosis
#12
REVIEW
Rajendra Sawh-Martinez, Derek M Steinbacher
Management strategies for syndromic craniosynostosis patients require multidisciplinary subspecialty teams to provide optimal care for complex reconstructive approaches. The most common craniosynostosis syndromes include Apert (FGFR2), Crouzon (FGFR2), Muenke (FGFR3), Pfeiffer (FGFR1 and FGFR2), and Saethre-Chotzen (TWIST). Bicoronal craniosynostosis (turribrachycephaly) is most commonly associated with syndromic craniosynostosis. Disease presentation varies from mild sutural involvement to severe pansynostoses, with a spectrum of extracraniofacial dysmorphic manifestations...
April 2019: Clinics in Plastic Surgery
https://read.qxmd.com/read/30851746/nonsyndromic-craniosynostosis
#13
REVIEW
Robert F Dempsey, Laura A Monson, Renata S Maricevich, Tuan A Truong, Shola Olarunnipa, Sandi K Lam, Robert C Dauser, Larry H Hollier, Edward P Buchanan
Nonsyndromic craniosynostosis is significantly more common than syndromic craniosynostosis, affecting the sagittal, coronal, metopic, and lambdoid sutures in decreasing order of frequency. Nonsyndromic craniosynostosis is most frequently associated with only 1 fused suture, creating a predictable head shape. Repair of craniosynostosis is recommended to avoid potential neurodevelopmental delay. Early intervention at 3 to 4 months of age allows minimally invasive approaches, but requires postoperative molding helmet therapy and good family compliance...
April 2019: Clinics in Plastic Surgery
https://read.qxmd.com/read/30447835/body-contouring-after-massive-weight-loss
#14
EDITORIAL
Jeffrey A Gusenoff
No abstract text is available yet for this article.
January 2019: Clinics in Plastic Surgery
https://read.qxmd.com/read/30447834/vertical-medial-thigh-contouring
#15
REVIEW
Joseph Michaels
Excess thigh laxity is a problem for many patients following significant weight loss. Thigh laxity has both vertical and horizontal components that require correction to optimize the aesthetic appearance of the thigh. The vertical vector is best corrected first with a lower body lift or extended abdominoplasty. The remaining loose skin in the medial thigh can then be removed using a horizontal vector resulting in a vertical incision. Residual vertical skin excess is also removed parallel to the groin crease...
January 2019: Clinics in Plastic Surgery
https://read.qxmd.com/read/30447833/patient-evaluation-and-surgical-staging
#16
REVIEW
Jennifer Capla, Lauren Shikowitz-Behr
Comprehensive evaluation of the massive-weight-loss patient is a key factor to minimize complications while optimizing surgical outcomes. Special attention is given to medical and weight loss history, nutritional status, and physical examination. Massive-weight-loss patients often present with multiple areas of concern and therefore benefit from staged procedures. Staging requires knowledge on how the tissues are affected by each procedure and an understanding of the patient's priorities and goals.
January 2019: Clinics in Plastic Surgery
https://read.qxmd.com/read/30447832/arm-contouring-in-the-massive-weight-loss-patient
#17
REVIEW
Paige L Myers, Ronald P Bossert
Brachioplasty is an increasingly popular procedure performed for improved arm contour in the massive-weight-loss population. There are challenging deformities presented in this population, such as redundant skin, posterior arm lipodystrophy, and loosening of fascial layers of the upper arm and chest wall that must be addressed to achieve successful contour of the arms. Common complications can be minimized with meticulous technique and knowledge of surgical anatomy. Additionally, brachioplasty can be combined with liposuction of the posterior arm as a safe and effective method for arm contouring without a higher risk of complications...
January 2019: Clinics in Plastic Surgery
https://read.qxmd.com/read/30447831/bra-line-back-lift
#18
REVIEW
Joseph Hunstad, Charlie Chen, Turkia Abbed
Upper back deformity caused by aging or fluctuations in weight are cosmetically and functionally unappealing to patients. Natural upper torso adherence zones create tether points that lead to horizontal and vertical laxity. Bra-line back lift is a versatile technique that can be used in any individual showing signs of redundant skin and adiposity. A 3-layered space-obliterating suture closure method prevents seroma and eliminates need for drain. Predictable outcomes correcting laxity from neck to lower back can be achieved...
January 2019: Clinics in Plastic Surgery
https://read.qxmd.com/read/30447830/breast-reshaping-after-massive-weight-loss
#19
REVIEW
Omar E Beidas, J Peter Rubin
The technique of dermal suspension, parenchymal reshaping mastopexy is a useful procedure for patients with massive weight loss with a typical presentation. The operation is tailored to the individual deformity, powerfully reshapes the breast, and can be safely combined with other commonly performed procedures. It is long-lasting and associated with minor complications that are easily treated in an office setting.
January 2019: Clinics in Plastic Surgery
https://read.qxmd.com/read/30447829/buttock-lifting-the-golden-rules
#20
REVIEW
Jean-Francois Pascal
There are some precise rules to succeed with a buttock lift. The article begins with a reminder about the ideal buttock shape. It explains the different quality of skin that is essential to be aware of at the back part of the body. Afterward it gives the tightening rule and the author's application in buttock lift. The markings and the cutting principles are described in detail. At the end, the article describes the problems of volume at the buttocks and about the author's new flap that is useful to avoid violin deformation...
January 2019: Clinics in Plastic Surgery
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