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Early short-term abdominal paracentesis drainage in moderately severe and severe acute pancreatitis with pelvic ascites.

BMC Surgery 2023 November 28
BACKGROUND: We sought to evaluate the effect of early short-term abdominal paracentesis drainage (APD) in moderately severe and severe acute pancreatitis (MSAP/SAP) with pelvic ascites.

METHODS: A total of 135 MSAP/SAP patients with early pelvic ascites were divided into the Short-term APD group (57 patients) and the Non-APD group (78 patients). The effects, complications, and prognosis of short-term APD patients were evaluated.

RESULTS: The baseline characteristics in the two groups were similar. The target days of intra-abdominal hypertension relief, half-dose enteral nutrition, duration of mechanical ventilation, length of intensive care unit stay (in days) and total hospitalization (also in days) were all lower in the Short-term APD group than in the Non-APD group (P = 0.002, 0.009, 0.004, 0.006 and 0.019), while the white blood cell count and serum C-reaction protein level decreased significantly more quickly (P < 0.01 and P < 0.05), and the prevalence of intra-abdominal infection was also significantly lower (P = 0.014) in the former than the latter. No complications occurred in early APD patients, and the microbial cultures of pelvic ascites were all negative. In addition, patients with early APD presented fewer cases of residual wall-off necrosis or fluid collection (P = 0.008) at discharge and had a lower incidence of rehospitalization and percutaneous catheter drainage and/or necrosectomy (P = 0.017 and 0.009).

CONCLUSIONS: For MSAP/SAP patients with pelvic ascites, the early short-term APD is feasible and safe to perform, and it can decrease clinical symptoms, reduce intra-abdominal infection and shorten the hospital stay. It may also reduce the incidence of rehospitalization and surgical intervention.

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