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Transfusion Practice: Hemolysis Markers After In Vitro Infusion of Packed Red Blood Cells by the Gravitational Method in Peripheral Catheter.

The objective of this study was to compare hemolysis marker levels after in vitro infusion of red blood cells (RBCs) according to storage time, infusion rate, and peripheral intravenous catheter size. This is an experimental study with randomly administered RBCs in quintuplicate, according to storage time shorter than and longer than 14 days, as well as infusion rate (50 mL/h and 100 mL/h) using catheters with calibers of 14-, 18-, and 20-gauge. Aliquots were collected from RBCs (V1), after equipment and catheter (V2) free-flow filling and after controlled infusion through the catheter (V3). The hemolytic markers analyzed were degree of hemolysis (%), hematocrit (Ht) (%), total hemoglobin (THb) (g/dL), free hemoglobin (FHb) (g/dL), potassium (K) (mmol/L), and lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) (U/L), considering a probability of error ≤5%. Sixty experiments were performed with the analysis of 180 aliquots. When RBCs aged <14 days were used, all catheters tended to increase THb, FHb, and K; while >14 days, RBCs presented increased FHb and degree of hemolysis with catheters of 18-gauge and THb levels at 14-gauge. Among the conditions analyzed, only 20-gauge catheters (the smallest) did not influence changes in hemolysis markers, regardless of RBC storage time.

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