ENGLISH ABSTRACT
JOURNAL ARTICLE
Add like
Add dislike
Add to saved papers

[Diagnostic value of high-field MRI for Peyronie's disease].

Objective: To analyze the MRI manifestations of Peyronie's disease and investigate the value of high-field MRI in the diagnosis of the disease.

METHODS: Using a small surface coil, we performed 3.0 Tesla MRI for 14 patients with clinically diagnosed Peyronie's disease. The MRI protocol included routine sequences (T1WI, T2WI, and enhanced T1WI) and susceptibility-weighted imaging (SWI). Each patient had received 2-4 penile ultrasound examinations previously. We compared the MRI findings with the results of ultrasonography.

RESULTS: MRI manifested 25 penile plaques in the 14 patients, 3 (7 plaques) with inflammation, 4 (8 plaques) with fibrosis, and the other 7 (10 plaques) with calcification displaying a low signal intensity on SWI. Ultrasonography had revealed the 10 calcified plaques in all the 20 examinations, but exhibited the 7 inflammatory and 8 fibrotic ones in only 3 of the 23 examinations. The combination of MRI SWI sequences was necessitated for the detection of calcified plaques and achieved higher detection rates than ultrasonography for inflammatory and fibrotic plaques (P<0.05).

CONCLUSIONS: High-field MRI has high sensitivity and accuracy in the diagnosis of Peyronie's disease, which can effectively display penile plaques of different nature in the early stage through multi-parametric sequences.

Full text links

We have located links that may give you full text access.
Can't access the paper?
Try logging in through your university/institutional subscription. For a smoother one-click institutional access experience, please use our mobile app.

For the best experience, use the Read mobile app

Mobile app image

Get seemless 1-tap access through your institution/university

For the best experience, use the Read mobile app

All material on this website is protected by copyright, Copyright © 1994-2024 by WebMD LLC.
This website also contains material copyrighted by 3rd parties.

By using this service, you agree to our terms of use and privacy policy.

Your Privacy Choices Toggle icon

You can now claim free CME credits for this literature searchClaim now

Get seemless 1-tap access through your institution/university

For the best experience, use the Read mobile app