JOURNAL ARTICLE
REVIEW

Acute mesenteric ischemia: guidelines of the World Society of Emergency Surgery

Miklosh Bala, Jeffry Kashuk, Ernest E Moore, Yoram Kluger, Walter Biffl, Carlos Augusto Gomes, Offir Ben-Ishay, Chen Rubinstein, Zsolt J Balogh, Ian Civil, Federico Coccolini, Ari Leppaniemi, Andrew Peitzman, Luca Ansaloni, Michael Sugrue, Massimo Sartelli, Salomone Di Saverio, Gustavo P Fraga, Fausto Catena
World Journal of Emergency Surgery: WJES 2017, 12: 38
28794797
Acute mesenteric ischemia (AMI) is typically defined as a group of diseases characterized by an interruption of the blood supply to varying portions of the small intestine, leading to ischemia and secondary inflammatory changes. If untreated, this process will eventuate in life threatening intestinal necrosis. The incidence is low, estimated at 0.09-0.2% of all acute surgical admissions. Therefore, although the entity is an uncommon cause of abdominal pain, diligence is always required because if untreated, mortality has consistently been reported in the range of 50%. Early diagnosis and timely surgical intervention are the cornerstones of modern treatment and are essential to reduce the high mortality associated with this entity. The advent of endovascular approaches in parallel with modern imaging techniques may provide new options. Thus, we believe that a current position paper from World Society of Emergency Surgery (WSES) is warranted, in order to put forth the most recent and practical recommendations for diagnosis and treatment of AMI. This review will address the concepts of AMI with the aim of focusing on specific areas where early diagnosis and management hold the strongest potential for improving outcomes in this disease process. Some of the key points include the prompt use of CT angiography to establish the diagnosis, evaluation of the potential for revascularization to re-establish blood flow to ischemic bowel, resection of necrotic intestine, and use of damage control techniques when appropriate to allow for re-assessment of bowel viability prior to definitive anastomosis and abdominal closure.

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Everton Janoski

Luke,
Must tell you, I am your father!!!

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Luke Sorensen

I was always taught that an AMI was an Acute Myocardial Infarction. Yet again another reason why not to abbreviate on paper.

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