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Ceftolozane-Tazobactam Activity against Pseudomonas aeruginosa Clinical Isolates from U.S. Hospitals: Report from the PACTS Antimicrobial Surveillance Program, 2012 to 2015.

The activity of ceftolozane-tazobactam was compared to the activities of 7 antimicrobials against 3,851 Pseudomonas aeruginosa isolates collected from 32 U.S. hospitals in the Program to Assess Ceftolozane-Tazobactam Susceptibility from 2012 to 2015. Ceftolozane-tazobactam and comparator susceptibilities were determined using the CLSI broth microdilution method at a central monitoring laboratory. For ceftolozane-tazobactam, 97.0% of the isolates were susceptible. Susceptibilities of the other antibacterials tested were: amikacin, 96.9%; cefepime, 85.9%; ceftazidime, 85.1%; colistin, 99.2%; levofloxacin, 76.6%; meropenem, 81.8%; and piperacillin-tazobactam, 80.4%. Of the 699 (18.1%) meropenem-nonsusceptible P. aeruginosa isolates, 87.6% were susceptible to ceftolozane-tazobactam. Six hundred seven isolates (15.8%) were classified as multidrug resistant (MDR), and 363 (9.4%) were classified as extensively drug resistant (XDR). Only 1 isolate was considered pandrug resistant, which was resistant to all tested agents, including colistin. Of the 607 MDR isolates, 84.9% were ceftolozane-tazobactam susceptible, and 76.9% of XDR isolates were ceftolozane-tazobactam susceptible. In vitro activity against drug-resistant P. aeruginosa indicates ceftolozane-tazobactam may be an important agent in treating serious bacterial infections.

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