JOURNAL ARTICLE

Age of menarche and near adult height after long-term gonadotropin-releasing hormone agonist treatment in girls with central precocious puberty

Joon-Woo Baek, Hyo-Kyoung Nam, Dahee Jin, Yeon Joung Oh, Young-Jun Rhie, Kee-Hyoung Lee
Annals of Pediatric Endocrinology & Metabolism 2014, 19 (1): 27-31
24926460

PURPOSE: Gonadotropin-releasing hormone agonist (GnRHa) is known for improving final adult height in patients with central precocious puberty (CPP). This study aimed to investigate the age of menarche and near adult height in girls with CPP who had been treated with GnRHa.

METHODS: In this retrospective study, we reviewed the medical records of 71 Korean girls with CPP who had started menarche or reached over 13 years of bone age after long-term GnRHa treatment. We estimated near adult height using the Bayley-Pinneau method and identified the age of menarche in girls with CPP.

RESULTS: Mean chronological and bone age at menarche were 11.9±0.7 and 12.8±0.4 years, respectively. The period between menarche and the end of treatment was 14.0±5.6 months. Posttreatment near adult height was 163.8±4.7 cm, which was significantly greater than pretreatment predicted adult height (158.7±4.1 cm).

CONCLUSION: GnRHa treatment in girls with CPP could improve final adult height and made the age of menarche close to that of the general population.

Full Text Links

Find Full Text Links for this Article

Discussion

You are not logged in. Sign Up or Log In to join the discussion.

Related Papers

Remove bar
Read by QxMD icon Read
24926460
×

Save your favorite articles in one place with a free QxMD account.

×

Search Tips

Use Boolean operators: AND/OR

diabetic AND foot
diabetes OR diabetic

Exclude a word using the 'minus' sign

Virchow -triad

Use Parentheses

water AND (cup OR glass)

Add an asterisk (*) at end of a word to include word stems

Neuro* will search for Neurology, Neuroscientist, Neurological, and so on

Use quotes to search for an exact phrase

"primary prevention of cancer"
(heart or cardiac or cardio*) AND arrest -"American Heart Association"