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Hyperuricemia in acute heart failure. More than a simple spectator?

Anna L Alimonda, Julio Núñez, Eduardo Núñez, Oliver Husser, Juan Sanchis, Vicent Bodí, Gema Miñana, Rocio Robles, Luis Mainar, Pilar Merlos, Helene Darmofal, Angel Llácer
European Journal of Internal Medicine 2009, 20 (1): 74-9
19237097

BACKGROUND: Hyperuricemia is a prevalent condition in chronic heart failure (CHF), describing increased oxidative stress and inflammation. Although there is evidence that serum uric acid (UA) predicts mortality in CHF, its role as a prognostic biomarker in acute heart failure (AHF) has not yet been well assessed. The aim of this study was to determine if UA levels predict all-cause mortality. Additionally, as a secondary endpoint we sought the clinical predictors of UA serum level in this population.

METHODS: We analyzed 560 consecutive patients with AHF admitted in a single university center. UA (mg/dl) was measured during early hospitalization. Patient survival status was followed up after discharge (median follow-up: 330 days). The independent association of UA level with all-cause mortality was analyzed using Cox regression analysis.

RESULTS: During follow-up 165 (29.5%) deaths were identified. Patients with UA levels above the median value (>or=7.7 mg/dl) exhibited higher mortality rates (21.1 vs. 37.9%; p<0.001). In multivariable analysis, after adjusting for recognized prognostic factors and potential confounders, UA>or=7.7 mg/dl and per change in 1 mg/dl of UA was associated with an increased risk of mortality (HR 1.45, CI 95%=1.03-2.44; p=0.03 and HR 1.08, CI 95%=1.01-1.15; p=0.03, respectively).

CONCLUSION: UA serum levels is an independent predictor of all-cause mortality in an unselected patients admitted with AHF.

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