collection
https://read.qxmd.com/read/26411330/drugs-for-the-treatment-of-nausea-and-vomiting-in-adults-in-the-emergency-department-setting
#1
REVIEW
Jeremy S Furyk, Robert A Meek, Diana Egerton-Warburton
BACKGROUND: Nausea and vomiting is a common and distressing presenting complaint in emergency departments (ED). The aetiology of nausea and vomiting in EDs is diverse and drugs are commonly prescribed. There is currently no consensus as to the optimum drug treatment of nausea and vomiting in the adult ED setting. OBJECTIVES: To provide evidence of the efficacy and safety of antiemetic medications in the management of nausea and vomiting in the adult ED setting. SEARCH METHODS: We searched the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials (CENTRAL; 2014, Issue 8), MEDLINE (OvidSP) (January 1966 to August 2014), EMBASE (OvidSP) (January 1980 to August 2014) and ISI Web of Science (January 1955 to August 2014)...
September 28, 2015: Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews
https://read.qxmd.com/read/24818542/antiemetic-use-for-nausea-and-vomiting-in-adult-emergency-department-patients-randomized-controlled-trial-comparing-ondansetron-metoclopramide-and-placebo
#2
RANDOMIZED CONTROLLED TRIAL
Diana Egerton-Warburton, Robert Meek, Michaela J Mee, George Braitberg
STUDY OBJECTIVE: We compare efficacy of ondansetron and metoclopramide with placebo for adults with undifferentiated emergency department (ED) nausea and vomiting. METHODS: A prospective, randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled trial was conducted in 2 metropolitan EDs in Melbourne, Australia. Eligible patients with ED nausea and vomiting were randomized to receive 4 mg intravenous ondansetron, 20 mg intravenous metoclopramide, or saline solution placebo. Primary outcome was mean change in visual analog scale (VAS) rating of nausea severity from enrollment to 30 minutes after study drug administration...
November 2014: Annals of Emergency Medicine
https://read.qxmd.com/read/20022195/antiemetic-therapy-for-nausea-and-vomiting-in-the-emergency-department
#3
REVIEW
Asad E Patanwala, Richard Amini, Daniel P Hays, Peter Rosen
BACKGROUND: Antiemetic agents are among the most frequently prescribed medications in the emergency department (ED). Nevertheless, there are no widely accepted evidence-based guidelines to optimize the use of these medications for nausea or vomiting in this setting. OBJECTIVE: The objective of this article is to briefly review the evidence supporting the use of antiemetic agents for the treatment of nausea or vomiting for adults in the ED, and to provide recommendations to help guide therapy...
September 2010: Journal of Emergency Medicine
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