collection
https://read.qxmd.com/read/25853745/age-of-transfused-blood-in-critically-ill-adults
#1
RANDOMIZED CONTROLLED TRIAL
Jacques Lacroix, Paul C Hébert, Dean A Fergusson, Alan Tinmouth, Deborah J Cook, John C Marshall, Lucy Clayton, Lauralyn McIntyre, Jeannie Callum, Alexis F Turgeon, Morris A Blajchman, Timothy S Walsh, Simon J Stanworth, Helen Campbell, Gilles Capellier, Pierre Tiberghien, Laurent Bardiaux, Leo van de Watering, Nardo J van der Meer, Elham Sabri, Dong Vo
BACKGROUND: Fresh red cells may improve outcomes in critically ill patients by enhancing oxygen delivery while minimizing the risks of toxic effects from cellular changes and the accumulation of bioactive materials in blood components during prolonged storage. METHODS: In this multicenter, randomized, blinded trial, we assigned critically ill adults to receive either red cells that had been stored for less than 8 days or standard-issue red cells (the oldest compatible units available in the blood bank)...
April 9, 2015: New England Journal of Medicine
https://read.qxmd.com/read/27774838/tranexamic-acid-in-patients-undergoing-coronary-artery-surgery
#2
RANDOMIZED CONTROLLED TRIAL
Paul S Myles, Julian A Smith, Andrew Forbes, Brendan Silbert, Mohandas Jayarajah, Thomas Painter, D James Cooper, Silvana Marasco, John McNeil, Jean S Bussières, Shay McGuinness, Kelly Byrne, Matthew T V Chan, Giovanni Landoni, Sophie Wallace
BACKGROUND: Tranexamic acid reduces the risk of bleeding among patients undergoing cardiac surgery, but it is unclear whether this leads to improved outcomes. Furthermore, there are concerns that tranexamic acid may have prothrombotic and proconvulsant effects. METHODS: In a trial with a 2-by-2 factorial design, we randomly assigned patients who were scheduled to undergo coronary-artery surgery and were at risk for perioperative complications to receive aspirin or placebo and tranexamic acid or placebo...
January 12, 2017: New England Journal of Medicine
https://read.qxmd.com/read/19318384/intensive-versus-conventional-glucose-control-in-critically-ill-patients
#3
RANDOMIZED CONTROLLED TRIAL
Simon Finfer, Dean R Chittock, Steve Yu-Shuo Su, Deborah Blair, Denise Foster, Vinay Dhingra, Rinaldo Bellomo, Deborah Cook, Peter Dodek, William R Henderson, Paul C Hébert, Stephane Heritier, Daren K Heyland, Colin McArthur, Ellen McDonald, Imogen Mitchell, John A Myburgh, Robyn Norton, Julie Potter, Bruce G Robinson, Juan J Ronco
BACKGROUND: The optimal target range for blood glucose in critically ill patients remains unclear. METHODS: Within 24 hours after admission to an intensive care unit (ICU), adults who were expected to require treatment in the ICU on 3 or more consecutive days were randomly assigned to undergo either intensive glucose control, with a target blood glucose range of 81 to 108 mg per deciliter (4.5 to 6.0 mmol per liter), or conventional glucose control, with a target of 180 mg or less per deciliter (10...
March 26, 2009: New England Journal of Medicine
https://read.qxmd.com/read/28792873/acute-respiratory-distress-syndrome
#4
REVIEW
B Taylor Thompson, Rachel C Chambers, Kathleen D Liu
New England Journal of Medicine, Volume 377, Issue 6, Page 562-572, August 2017.
August 10, 2017: New England Journal of Medicine
https://read.qxmd.com/read/25647203/transfusion-of-plasma-platelets-and-red-blood-cells-in-a-1-1-1-vs-a-1-1-2-ratio-and-mortality-in-patients-with-severe-trauma-the-proppr-randomized-clinical-trial
#5
RANDOMIZED CONTROLLED TRIAL
John B Holcomb, Barbara C Tilley, Sarah Baraniuk, Erin E Fox, Charles E Wade, Jeanette M Podbielski, Deborah J del Junco, Karen J Brasel, Eileen M Bulger, Rachael A Callcut, Mitchell Jay Cohen, Bryan A Cotton, Timothy C Fabian, Kenji Inaba, Jeffrey D Kerby, Peter Muskat, Terence O'Keeffe, Sandro Rizoli, Bryce R H Robinson, Thomas M Scalea, Martin A Schreiber, Deborah M Stein, Jordan A Weinberg, Jeannie L Callum, John R Hess, Nena Matijevic, Christopher N Miller, Jean-Francois Pittet, David B Hoyt, Gail D Pearson, Brian Leroux, Gerald van Belle
IMPORTANCE: Severely injured patients experiencing hemorrhagic shock often require massive transfusion. Earlier transfusion with higher blood product ratios (plasma, platelets, and red blood cells), defined as damage control resuscitation, has been associated with improved outcomes; however, there have been no large multicenter clinical trials. OBJECTIVE: To determine the effectiveness and safety of transfusing patients with severe trauma and major bleeding using plasma, platelets, and red blood cells in a 1:1:1 ratio compared with a 1:1:2 ratio...
February 3, 2015: JAMA: the Journal of the American Medical Association
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