Comparative Study
Journal Article
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Comparison of outcomes following transhiatal or Ivor Lewis esophagectomy for esophageal carcinoma.

Transhiatal esophagectomy (THO) may be a valid alternative to the traditional Ivor Lewis (ILO) procedure, but there have been reservations about procedure mortality, nodal clearance, and survival. ILO is preferred for bulky midesophageal lesions and THO in frail patients, making randomization difficult. This retrospective study compares results of a 10-year period from January 1985 with a minimum follow-up period of 12 months. Four patients were lost to follow-up. Preoperative nutritional markers were similar in the two groups, as were the age and sex distribution. Altogether 33 ILOs and 65 THOs were performed. TNM staging was similar between groups, there being 43% stage II and 45% stage III lesions among the ILO patients and 53% stage II and 32% stage III disease in the THO group. Operating time was shorter for THO (256 +/- 58 minutes vs. 279 +/- 50 minutes) (p = 0.05); if two surgeons operated concurrently, THO could be performed 40 minutes quicker than THO or ILO performed by a single surgeon (p = 0.018). The mean initial intensive care unit stay was 2.9 days for ILO versus 1.7 days for THO (p = 0.014). The 30-day mortality was 5.1%; total in-hospital mortality was 7.1% with no difference for operation type. There were similar morbidity rates for the procedures. Kaplan-Meier survival analysis indicated no significant effect of surgical technique; there were no apparent advantages for either operation when patients were compared by tumor type or matched for stage. Hence THO is a valid alternative to ILO, particularly for stage II and III cancer.

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