JOURNAL ARTICLE
REVIEW

Open surgical treatment of anterior glenohumeral instability: an historical perspective and review of the literature. Part II

A S Rokito, S Namkoong, J D Zuckerman, M A Gallagher
American Journal of Orthopedics 1998, 27 (12): 784-90
9880094
Anterior glenohumeral instability is an undesirable result of trauma to the shoulder. Several surgical treatments for this condition have been developed, beginning in the early years of the twentieth century. Although many of these procedures were popular at their inception, many of them have fallen out of favor as more information has been acquired concerning the long-term results and complications of their use. While often successful in preventing recurrent instability, these earlier procedures also often led to a loss of external rotation, and consequently, function. Newer procedures have been devised that aim to prevent recurrent instability while maintaining full range of motion and function. Part I of this paper, published in the November issue, presented a brief history of the treatment of glenohumeral instability and a review of the literature, including the Bankart and du Toit procedures. Part II includes the Putti-Platt, the Magnuson-Stack, the Bristow, and capsular shift procedures.

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