JOURNAL ARTICLE

Hemorrhage exacerbates bacterial translocation at low levels of intra-abdominal pressure

N J Gargiulo, R J Simon, W Leon, G W Machiedo
Archives of Surgery 1998, 133 (12): 1351-5
9865655

BACKGROUND: It has been shown previously that the adverse cardiopulmonary sequelae of increased intra-abdominal pressure (IAP) are worsened by hemorrhage and resuscitation. Bacterial translocation (BT) to the mesenteric lymph nodes (MLNs), liver, and spleen has also been shown to occur with increased IAP.

OBJECTIVE: To investigate the hypothesis that BT associated with elevated IAP would be significantly increased after hemorrhage and resuscitation.

MATERIALS AND METHODS: Anesthetized adult male rats had femoral artery and vein catheters placed, and an intra-abdominal catheter placed to measure IAP. Group 1 underwent surgery only and served as controls. Group 2 had IAP raised to 10 mm Hg by infused lactated Ringer's solution for 40 minutes. Group 3 had a 25% hemorrhage, followed by resuscitation by infused lactated Ringer's solution and shed blood. Group 4 first had a 25% hemorrhage, resuscitated using infused lactated Ringer's solution and shed blood, and then had IAP raised to 10 mm Hg by infused lactated Ringer's solution for 40 minutes. All groups were killed after 2 hours, and had MLNs, liver, and spleen harvested for quantitative cultures.

RESULTS: Hemorrhage and resuscitation alone did not increase BT to the MLNs, liver, or spleen. An increase in IAP to 10 mm Hg resulted in a significant level of BT to the MLNs and liver on MacConkey II agar (P<.05), and a significant increase in the level of BT only to the liver on trypticase soy agar with 5% sheep's blood (P<.05). Hemorrhage and resuscitation did increase the level of BT to the liver and spleen when IAP was increased to 10 mm Hg (P<.05).

CONCLUSIONS: In this model, hemorrhage and resuscitation alone did not increase BT to the MLNs, liver, or spleen. However, hemorrhage and resuscitation increased BT to the liver and spleen when IAP was increased to 10 mm Hg. This supports the concept that prior hemorrhage and resuscitation exacerbates the effects of increased IAP.

Full Text Links

Find Full Text Links for this Article

Discussion

You are not logged in. Sign Up or Log In to join the discussion.

Trending Papers

Remove bar
Read by QxMD icon Read
9865655
×

Save your favorite articles in one place with a free QxMD account.

×

Search Tips

Use Boolean operators: AND/OR

diabetic AND foot
diabetes OR diabetic

Exclude a word using the 'minus' sign

Virchow -triad

Use Parentheses

water AND (cup OR glass)

Add an asterisk (*) at end of a word to include word stems

Neuro* will search for Neurology, Neuroscientist, Neurological, and so on

Use quotes to search for an exact phrase

"primary prevention of cancer"
(heart or cardiac or cardio*) AND arrest -"American Heart Association"