Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Research Support, U.S. Gov't, P.H.S.
Review
Add like
Add dislike
Add to saved papers

Treatment of Guillain-Barré syndrome with intravenous immunoglobulin.

Neurology 1998 December
Guillain-Barré syndrome (GBS) is an acute polyneuropathy that typically presents as a progressive flaccid paralysis. The pathology is believed to be caused by both cellular and humoral immune processes. This inflammatory neuropathy has a mortality rate of 4-5%. About 30% of patients require mechanical ventilation, and these patients are often hospitalized for months before regaining the ability to walk. Immunomodulation is used to improve the recovery rate and shorten hospital stays. Plasma exchange was shown to be effective in improving recovery time in GBS in several controlled trials during the 1980s. In this decade, intravenous immunoglobulin (IVIg) therapy has been shown to be equally effective for therapy of GBS and its variants. Although the precise mechanisms of immunomodulation by IVIg are unknown, it probably directly inactivates specific anti-myelin antibodies and indirectly inhibits their production. IVIg offers some advantages over plasma exchange by being better tolerated in some patients and being easily administered without special equipment. However, because of the possibility of progression, the treatment of GBS patients requires qualified neurologic and supportive care.

Full text links

We have located links that may give you full text access.
Can't access the paper?
Try logging in through your university/institutional subscription. For a smoother one-click institutional access experience, please use our mobile app.

Related Resources

For the best experience, use the Read mobile app

Mobile app image

Get seemless 1-tap access through your institution/university

For the best experience, use the Read mobile app

All material on this website is protected by copyright, Copyright © 1994-2024 by WebMD LLC.
This website also contains material copyrighted by 3rd parties.

By using this service, you agree to our terms of use and privacy policy.

Your Privacy Choices Toggle icon

You can now claim free CME credits for this literature searchClaim now

Get seemless 1-tap access through your institution/university

For the best experience, use the Read mobile app