Journal Article
Multicenter Study
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
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Natural antibiotic susceptibility of Providencia stuartii, P. rettgeri, P. alcalifaciens and P. rustigianii strains.

The natural antibiotic susceptibility of 38 Providencia rettgeri, 35 P. stuartii, 23 P. alcalifaciens and 20 P. rustigianii strains was examined. MIC values were determined by a microdilution procedure and evaluated by a table calculation programme. P. stuartii was the least susceptible Providencia sp. and was naturally resistant to tetracyclines, some penicillins, older cephalosporins, sulphamethoxazole and fosfomycin and to antibiotics to which other species of Enterobacteriaceae are also resistant. It was naturally sensitive to modern penicillins and cephalosporins, carbapenems and aztreonam, but its susceptibility to aminoglycosides and quinolones was difficult to assess. P. alcalifaciens and P. rustigianii strains were the most susceptible Providencia spp. They were naturally sensitive or intermediate to tetracyclines and sensitive to aminoglycosides and quinolones. Susceptibility to sparfloxacin, biapenem and sulphamethoxazole permitted the discrimination of P. alcalifaciens and P. rustigianii strains. The natural antibiotic susceptibility of P. rettgeri strains was between that of P. stuartii and that of the other providenciae. P. rettgeri was resistant to tetracyclines and fosfomycin, but more susceptible to aminoglycosides, quinolones, fosfomycin and numerous beta-lactam antibiotics than P. stuartii. A database is described of the natural antibiotic susceptibilities of Providencia spp. It can be used for the validation of antibiotic susceptibility test results of these micro-organisms.

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