Case Reports
Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Research Support, U.S. Gov't, P.H.S.
Add like
Add dislike
Add to saved papers

Recombinant interleukin-6 in the treatment of congenital thrombocytopenia associated with absent radii.

PURPOSE: The role interleukin-6 (IL-6) in the treatment of congenital thrombocytopenias is unknown. The purpose of this case report is to describe the efficacy of IL-6 in a child with thrombocytopenia with absent radii (TAR) syndrome.

METHODS: A 23-month-old girl with TAR syndrome was treated with recombinant IL-6 (Sigosix; Serono Laboratories, Norwell, MA) at a dose of 7 micrograms/kg subcutaneously daily. Complete blood counts were monitored weekly. The child was closely monitored for any toxicity.

RESULTS: After 3 weeks of therapy, the patient had an increase in platelet count from a baseline of 5,000 to 8,000/microliter to a maximal level of 33,000/microliter. She was platelet transfusion-independent during IL-6 therapy. Fevers and chills, the main toxicities encountered, were controlled with acetaminophen and ibuprofen. An increase in the IL-6 dose caused anemia with no further increase in platelet count. After discontinuation of the drug, her hemoglobin rose to baseline and the platelet count returned to pretreatment levels.

CONCLUSIONS: We conclude that IL-6 may benefit some children with TAR syndrome. The role of IL-6 and other thrombopoietic agents in the treatment of TAR and other congenital thrombocytopenias deserves further clinical study.

Full text links

We have located links that may give you full text access.
Can't access the paper?
Try logging in through your university/institutional subscription. For a smoother one-click institutional access experience, please use our mobile app.

Related Resources

For the best experience, use the Read mobile app

Mobile app image

Get seemless 1-tap access through your institution/university

For the best experience, use the Read mobile app

All material on this website is protected by copyright, Copyright © 1994-2024 by WebMD LLC.
This website also contains material copyrighted by 3rd parties.

By using this service, you agree to our terms of use and privacy policy.

Your Privacy Choices Toggle icon

You can now claim free CME credits for this literature searchClaim now

Get seemless 1-tap access through your institution/university

For the best experience, use the Read mobile app