CASE REPORTS
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[Kasabach-Merritt syndrome on a congenital tufted angioma].

INTRODUCTION: Kasabach-Merritt syndrome is a very rare disease of infancy, with profound thrombocytopenia and a mild to severe consumption coagulopathy; this biological phenomenon is difficult to control.

CASE REPORT: A 1-month old boy had a congenital plaque-like lesion in the calf. It was a biopsy-proven tufted angioma. Five weeks later, Kasabach-Merritt syndrome developed. After failure of ticlopidine + aspirin, and oral betamethasone treatment, thrombocytopenia was cured with vincristine treatment, then the leg lesion slowly continued to shrink after cessation of the treatment. It had disappeared before the age of 1 year.

DISCUSSION: We highlighted two points: 1) Kasabach Merritt does not appear as a complication of a classic hemangioma (infantile, "cellular", "capillary", involuting-type), as it has long been thought. In our experience, it develops on a different endothelial cell proliferation, in this case a congenital tufted angioma, but it can also engraft on a kaposiform hemangioendothelioma. 2) These patients are difficult to treat because, up to now, no single treatment has given constant by good results. Vincristine was recently introduced in the treatment of Kasabach-Merritt syndrome, with excellent, rapid outcome.

CONCLUSION: What seems a therapeutic progress in a difficult field needs further control.

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