CASE REPORTS
JOURNAL ARTICLE
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Hemobilia caused by a giant benign hemangioma of the liver: report of a case.

We report herein the extremely unusual case of a 39-year-old woman in whom a giant cavernous hemangioma caused hemobilia. Cavernous hemangioma is the most common benign neoplasm of the liver and rarely causes any clinical symptoms or signs, while hemobilia usually occurs secondary to accidental operative or iatrogenic trauma, vascular disease, inflammatory disorders, gallstones, or tumors of the liver. Although invasive or malignant hepatic tumors often result in a communication between the biliary tract and the blood vessels, only one case of hemobilia caused by a benign cavernous hemangioma has ever been reported, but with no details about the patient. Our patient presented to a local hospital with severe melena as the initial main symptom, where ligation of the right hepatic artery was performed. This failed to relieve her symptoms, and she was subsequently referred to our department where a right hepatectomy was performed. Histopathological examination revealed no malignancy combined with the tumor; however, the hemangioma was exposed to the bile duct in segment VIII, which was presumably the cause of the hemobilia. This patient remains in good health almost 6 years after her operation. To the best of our knowledge this is the first case report of hemobilia caused by a cavernous hemangioma, and is accompanied by a detailed analysis.

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