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[Sebaceous gland hyperplasia as a side effect of cyclosporin A. Treatment with the CO2 laser].

HISTORY AND CLINICAL FINDINGS: After renal transplantation 11 years previously followed by immunosuppression with cyclosporin A, a 59-year-old man developed, shortly after starting the medication, skin-coloured nodules in the region of both ears and the forehead. In the subsequent years the skin changes spread throughout the entire face. The nodes (up to 2 cm in diameter) and nodules were soft and yellowish-white in colour. In addition there were numerous distinct telangiectasias over the whole face.

INVESTIGATIONS: Several skin biopsies were taken. They showed largely unremarkable epidermis but marked enlargement and multiplication of the sebaceous glands.

DIAGNOSIS, TREATMENT AND COURSE: In view of the histological findings the diagnosis of sebaceous hyperplasia was established. After a trial with carbon dioxide laser, treatment over the entire surface of the two auricles was undertaken under full anaesthesia. The normal auricular contour was reconstituted by removal of the papules and nodes, without any scar formation.

CONCLUSION: In the absence of an alternative medication and if the very marked skin changes show no sign of regression, "shaving off" by scalpel of the nodes and nodules or conventional surgery has been the available treatment. However, removal by carbon dioxide laser has the advantage of fewer side effect, is less stressful to the patient and provides a dry operative field.

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