JOURNAL ARTICLE
RESEARCH SUPPORT, NON-U.S. GOV'T
RESEARCH SUPPORT, U.S. GOV'T, P.H.S.
Add like
Add dislike
Add to saved papers

Involvement of microsomal fatty aldehyde dehydrogenase in the alpha-oxidation of phytanic acid.

FEBS Letters 1998 June 17
We investigated the role of microsomal fatty aldehyde dehydrogenase (FALDH) in the conversion of pristanal into pristanic acid. Cultured skin fibroblasts from controls and patients with Sjögren-Larsson syndrome (SLS) who are genetically deficient in FALDH activity were incubated with [2,3-(3)H]phytanic acid. The release of aqueous-soluble radioactivity by the SLS cells was decreased to 25% of normal, consistent with an intact formation of pristanal but a deficiency of further oxidation. SLS cells also accumulated four-fold more radioactivity in N-alkyl-phosphatidyl ethanolamine, which arises from incorporation of free aldehyde into phosphatidyl ethanolamine. Recombinant human FALDH expressed in Chinese hamster ovary cells readily oxidized pristanal and cultured fibroblasts from SLS patients showed a severe deficiency in FALDH activity (13% of normal) when pristanal was used as substrate. Nevertheless, SLS patients did not accumulate phytanic acid in their plasma. We conclude that FALDH is involved in the oxidation of pristanal to pristanic acid and that this reaction is deficient in patients with SLS.

Full text links

We have located links that may give you full text access.
Can't access the paper?
Try logging in through your university/institutional subscription. For a smoother one-click institutional access experience, please use our mobile app.

For the best experience, use the Read mobile app

Mobile app image

Get seemless 1-tap access through your institution/university

For the best experience, use the Read mobile app

All material on this website is protected by copyright, Copyright © 1994-2024 by WebMD LLC.
This website also contains material copyrighted by 3rd parties.

By using this service, you agree to our terms of use and privacy policy.

Your Privacy Choices Toggle icon

You can now claim free CME credits for this literature searchClaim now

Get seemless 1-tap access through your institution/university

For the best experience, use the Read mobile app