Add like
Add dislike
Add to saved papers

Late outcome of the surgical treatment of hydrocephalus.

The purpose of this report is to analyze the long-term outcome in hydrocephalic children treated by shunt placement and in particular their psycho-intellectual development. In the case of shunt placement postoperative mortality is virtually nil, and the overall mortality rate after 10 years of follow-up has been reduced to less than 5%. Morbidity, in contrast, is far from satisfactory. This study was conducted in 129 consecutive children with nontumorous hydrocephalus who underwent a first shunt insertion before the age of 2 years between 1979 and 1982 and who were followed up for at least 10 years. The final neurological examination revealed a motor deficit in 60%, visual or auditory deficits in 25%, and epilepsy in 30%. The final IQs were above 90 in 32% of the children, between 70 and 90 in 28%, between 50 and 70 in 19%, and lower than 50 in 21%. Integration into the normal school system was possible for 60% of the children, but half of them were 1-2 years behind their age group or having difficulties; 31% were attending special classes or were in institutions; and 9% were considered ineducable. The presence of behavioral disorders was a determinant factor for scholastic and social integration. Such disorders were frequent, and were characterized as severe in 30%. A relationship between final outcome and etiology, initial ventricular size, and epilepsy was observed. These results are used as the basis of a discussion on how morbidity might be improved.

Full text links

We have located links that may give you full text access.
Can't access the paper?
Try logging in through your university/institutional subscription. For a smoother one-click institutional access experience, please use our mobile app.

Related Resources

For the best experience, use the Read mobile app

Mobile app image

Get seemless 1-tap access through your institution/university

For the best experience, use the Read mobile app

All material on this website is protected by copyright, Copyright © 1994-2024 by WebMD LLC.
This website also contains material copyrighted by 3rd parties.

By using this service, you agree to our terms of use and privacy policy.

Your Privacy Choices Toggle icon

You can now claim free CME credits for this literature searchClaim now

Get seemless 1-tap access through your institution/university

For the best experience, use the Read mobile app