Journal Article
Research Support, U.S. Gov't, Non-P.H.S.
Research Support, U.S. Gov't, P.H.S.
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The 97 kDa linear IgA bullous disease antigen is identical to a portion of the extracellular domain of the 180 kDa bullous pemphigoid antigen, BPAg2.

IgA autoantibodies from the sera of some patients with linear IgA bullous dermatosis (LABD) recognize a 97 kDa antigen (LABD97) located in the lamina lucida of the basement membrane zone. As LABD autoantibodies do not react with the 180 and 230 kDa proteins recognized by bullous pemphigoid autoantibodies, LABD97 has been thought to represent a separate lamina lucida protein. In this study, we purified LABD97 from the extract of human epidermis using a monoclonal antibody immunoaffinity column and analyzed the amino acid sequence of the N terminus of purified LABD97. This revealed a 16 amino acid sequence that was identical to a previously reported sequence of the 180 kDa antigen in bullous pemphigoid (BPAg2). The N terminus was located 41 amino acids downstream from the carboxyl end of the transmembrane domain of BPAg2 and 11 amino acids downstream from the MCW-1 domain, the predominant bullous pemphigoid epitope. Purified LABD97 was subsequently enzymatically digested with endoproteinase Arg C and separated by chromatography, which resulted in multiple peptide fractions. Fourteen of these fractions were subjected to amino acid sequencing. The amino acid sequence of the peptide fractions, totaling 205 amino acids, were identical to sequences contained within the extracellular domain of BPAg2. Whereas the predominant epitope identified with bullous pemphigoid sera is located in the noncollagenous region of this protein, the epitope recognized by LABD sera is either within or adjacent to the collagenous portion. We conclude that LABD97 represents a portion of the extracellular domain of BPAg2 and that the IgA autoantibodies are directed against an epitope within or adjacent to a collagenous domain.

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