JOURNAL ARTICLE

Ascorbic acid supplement use and the prevalence of gallbladder disease. Heart & Estrogen-Progestin Replacement Study (HERS) Research Group

J A Simon, D Grady, M C Snabes, J Fong, D B Hunninghake
Journal of Clinical Epidemiology 1998, 51 (3): 257-65
9495691
To investigate the relation of ascorbic acid supplement use to gallbladder disease and cholecystectomy, we conducted a cross-sectional analysis of baseline from 2744 postmenopausal women, aged 44-79 years, enrolled in the Heart & Estrogen-progestin Replacement Study (HERS), a secondary coronary heart disease prevention trial. A total of 629 HERS participants (23%) reported a history of gallbladder disease. Of these, 508 (19%) also reported a history of cholecystectomy. In bivariate models, ascorbic acid supplement use was associated with a decreased prevalence of gallbladder disease [odds ratio (OR)=0.74; 95% confidence interval (CI), 0.57, 0.96] and a trend toward a decreased prevalence of cholecystectomy (OR=0.77; 95% CI, 0.58, 1.02). Because we detected significant interactions between ascorbic acid supplement use and alcohol consumption, multivariate analyses were performed stratified by drinking status. After adjustment for potential confounding variables, use of ascorbic acid supplements among drinkers was associated with a decreased prevalence of gallbladder disease (adjusted OR=0.50; 95% CI, 0.31, 0.81) and cholecystectomy (adjusted OR=0.38; 95% CI, 0.21, 0.67). Use of ascorbic acid supplements among non-drinkers was not significantly associated with either prevalence of gallbladder disease or cholecystectomy. Further study is necessary to confirm our findings and, specifically, to examine the combined effects of ascorbic acid and alcohol on cholesterol metabolism.

Full Text Links

Find Full Text Links for this Article

Discussion

You are not logged in. Sign Up or Log In to join the discussion.

Trending Papers

Remove bar
Read by QxMD icon Read
9495691
×

Save your favorite articles in one place with a free QxMD account.

×

Search Tips

Use Boolean operators: AND/OR

diabetic AND foot
diabetes OR diabetic

Exclude a word using the 'minus' sign

Virchow -triad

Use Parentheses

water AND (cup OR glass)

Add an asterisk (*) at end of a word to include word stems

Neuro* will search for Neurology, Neuroscientist, Neurological, and so on

Use quotes to search for an exact phrase

"primary prevention of cancer"
(heart or cardiac or cardio*) AND arrest -"American Heart Association"