JOURNAL ARTICLE
RESEARCH SUPPORT, NON-U.S. GOV'T
RESEARCH SUPPORT, U.S. GOV'T, P.H.S.
Add like
Add dislike
Add to saved papers

Self-efficacy for arthritis pain: relationship to perception of thermal laboratory pain stimuli.

OBJECTIVE: To examine how self-efficacy for arthritis pain relates to the perception of controlled laboratory pain stimuli.

METHODS: Forty patients with osteoarthritis completed self-report measures of self-efficacy for arthritis pain. They then participated in a single experimental session in which measures of thermal pain threshold and tolerance were collected, as well as measures of the perceived intensity and unpleasantness of a range of thermal pain stimuli.

RESULTS: Correlational analyses revealed that patients reporting high self-efficacy for arthritis pain rated the thermal pain stimuli as less unpleasant than those reporting low self-efficacy. When subjects scoring very high and very low in self-efficacy were compared, it was found that subjects scoring high on self-efficacy for arthritis pain had significantly higher pain thresholds and pain tolerance than those scoring low on self-efficacy.

CONCLUSIONS: These results indicate that self-efficacy for arthritis pain is related to judgments of thermal pain stimuli. Implications for the understanding of arthritis pain and for future laboratory research are discussed.

Full text links

We have located links that may give you full text access.
Can't access the paper?
Try logging in through your university/institutional subscription. For a smoother one-click institutional access experience, please use our mobile app.

Related Resources

For the best experience, use the Read mobile app

Mobile app image

Get seemless 1-tap access through your institution/university

For the best experience, use the Read mobile app

All material on this website is protected by copyright, Copyright © 1994-2024 by WebMD LLC.
This website also contains material copyrighted by 3rd parties.

By using this service, you agree to our terms of use and privacy policy.

Your Privacy Choices Toggle icon

You can now claim free CME credits for this literature searchClaim now

Get seemless 1-tap access through your institution/university

For the best experience, use the Read mobile app