JOURNAL ARTICLE

Population-based study of sleep-disordered breathing as a risk factor for hypertension

T Young, P Peppard, M Palta, K M Hla, L Finn, B Morgan, J Skatrud
Archives of Internal Medicine 1997 August 11, 157 (15): 1746-52
9250236

BACKGROUND: Clinical observations have linked sleep-disordered breathing, a condition of repeated apneas and hypopneas during sleep, with hypertension but evidence for an independent association has been lacking. Understanding this relationship is important because the prevalence of sleep-disordered breathing is high in adults.

OBJECTIVE: To test the hypothesis that sleep-disordered breathing is related to elevated blood pressure independent of confounding factors.

METHODS: The sample included 1060 employed women and men aged 30 through 60 years who had completed an overnight protocol as part of the Wisconsin Sleep Cohort Study. In-laboratory polysomnography was used to determine sleep-disordered breathing status, quantified as the number of apneas and hypopneas per hour of sleep (apnea-hypopnea index). Blood pressure was measured on the night polysomnography was performed.

RESULTS: Blood pressure increased linearly with increasing apnea-hypopnea index (P = .003 for systolic, P = .01 for diastolic, adjusted for confounding factors). The magnitude of the linear association increased with decreasing obesity. At a body mass index (weight in kilograms divided by the square of the height in meters) of 30 kg/m2, an apnea-hypopnea index of 15 (vs 0) was associated with blood pressure increases of 3.6 mm Hg for systolic (95% confidence interval, 1.3-6.0) and 1.8 mm Hg for diastolic (95% confidence interval, 0.3-3.3). The odds ratio for hypertension associated with an apnea-hypopnea index of 15 (vs 0) was 1.8 (95% confidence interval, 1.3-2.4).

CONCLUSIONS: There is a dose-response relationship between sleep-disordered breathing and blood pressure, independent of known confounding factors. If causal, the high prevalence of sleep-disordered breathing could account for hypertension in a substantial number of adults in the United States.

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