JOURNAL ARTICLE
RESEARCH SUPPORT, NON-U.S. GOV'T
Add like
Add dislike
Add to saved papers

Identification of tissue transglutaminase as the autoantigen of celiac disease.

Nature Medicine 1997 July
Celiac disease is characterized by small intestinal damage with loss of absorptive villi and hyperplasia of the crypts, typically leading to malabsorption. In addition to nutrient deficiencies, prolonged celiac disease is associated with an increased risk for malignancy, especially intestinal T-cell lymphoma. Celiac disease is precipitated by ingestion of the protein gliadin, a component of wheat gluten, and usually resolves on its withdrawal. Gliadin initiates mucosal damage which involves an immunological process in individuals with a genetic predisposition. However, the mechanism responsible for the small intestinal damage characteristic of celiac disease is still under debate. Small intestinal biopsy with the demonstration of a flat mucosa which is reversed on a gluten-free diet is considered the main approach for diagnosis of classical celiac disease. In addition, IgA antibodies against gliadin and endomysium, a structure of the smooth muscle connective tissue, are valuable tools for the detection of patients with celiac disease and for therapy control. Incidence rates of childhood celiac disease range from 1:300 in Western Ireland to 1:4700 in other European countries, and subclinical cases detected by serological screening revealed prevalences of 3.3 and 4 per 1000 in Italy and the USA, respectively. IgA antibodies to endomysium are particularly specific indicators of celiac disease, suggesting that this structure contains one or more target autoantigens that play a role in the pathogenesis of the disease. However, the identification of the endomysial autoantigen(s) has remained elusive. We identified tissue transglutaminase as the unknown endomysial autoantigen. Interestingly, gliadin is a preferred substrate for this enzyme, giving rise to novel antigenic epitopes.

Full text links

We have located links that may give you full text access.
Can't access the paper?
Try logging in through your university/institutional subscription. For a smoother one-click institutional access experience, please use our mobile app.

For the best experience, use the Read mobile app

Mobile app image

Get seemless 1-tap access through your institution/university

For the best experience, use the Read mobile app

All material on this website is protected by copyright, Copyright © 1994-2024 by WebMD LLC.
This website also contains material copyrighted by 3rd parties.

By using this service, you agree to our terms of use and privacy policy.

Your Privacy Choices Toggle icon

You can now claim free CME credits for this literature searchClaim now

Get seemless 1-tap access through your institution/university

For the best experience, use the Read mobile app