COMPARATIVE STUDY
JOURNAL ARTICLE
RANDOMIZED CONTROLLED TRIAL

["Tension-free technique" in open inguinal hernia repair. A prospective, randomized study of postoperative pain perception ("tension-free reconstruction" vs. Shouldice technique)]

R Schmitz, J Treckmann, S Shah, K Schneider
Der Chirurg; Zeitschrift Für Alle Gebiete der Operativen Medizen 1997, 68 (3): 259-63
9198569
A prospective randomized study was performed on 64 patients suffering from primary inguinal hernia. Two groups were formed, each consisting of 32 patients. The patients either underwent tension-free surgical treatment or Shouldice herniorraphy. The aim of the study was to determine if the tension-free operative technique on inguinal hernia patients reduces postoperative pain intensity by 2 days in comparison to the patients receiving Shouldice repair treatment. By using the VAS was shown that at no time was there any significant difference in the pain sensation levels between the two groups. The amount of pain tablets consumed among the patients was similar in each group. The number of complications in both groups was also comparable. During the postoperative follow-up of 6 days six patients in the tension-free surgical group and four patients in the Shouldice group developed uncomplicated hematomas on the 4th day, which were traced to the heparin medication. One patient from the Shouldice group suffered from temporary swelling of the scrotum. The advantage of open tension-free repair using extraperitoneally placed polypropylene mesh is that the technique is simple, size-adapted, and can be carried out easily and at any time under local anesthesia. With regard to the lower recurrence rate of hernia as published in the American literature, this can only be verified by randomized studies.

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