JOURNAL ARTICLE
RESEARCH SUPPORT, NON-U.S. GOV'T
RESEARCH SUPPORT, U.S. GOV'T, NON-P.H.S.
RESEARCH SUPPORT, U.S. GOV'T, P.H.S.
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Domain-specific interactions of human HP1-type chromodomain proteins and inner nuclear membrane protein LBR.

HP1-type chromodomain proteins self-associate as well as interact with the inner nuclear membrane protein LBR (lamin B receptor) and transcriptional coactivators TIF1alpha and TIF1beta. The domains of these proteins that mediate their various interactions have not been entirely defined. HP1-type proteins are predicted by hydrophobic cluster analysis to consist of two homologous but distinct globular domains, corresponding to the chromodomain and chromo shadow domain, separated by a hinge region. We show here that the chromo shadow domain mediates the self-associations of HP1-type proteins and is also necessary for binding to LBR both in vitro and in the yeast two-hybrid assay. Hydrophobic cluster analysis also predicts that the nucleoplasmic amino-terminal portion of LBR contains two globular domains separated by a hinge region. The interactions of the LBR domains with an HP1-type protein were also analyzed by the yeast two-hybrid and in vitro binding assays, which showed that a portion of the second globular domain is necessary for binding. The modular domain organization of HP1-type proteins and LBR can explain some of the diverse protein-protein interactions at the chromatin-lamina-membrane interface of the nuclear envelope.

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