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Wandering spleen: a challenging diagnosis.

Wandering spleen is rare, particularly in children, and diagnosis is difficult. It usually occurs at 20 to 40 years of age, and most cases are seen in women. Diagnosis is difficult because of lack of symptoms, unless splenic torsion has occurred. Patients usually have an asymptomatic abdominal mass, an acute abdomen, or, most commonly, a mass associated with pain. Laboratory data are nonspecific, but the diagnosis can be confirmed by imaging studies; computed tomography and duplex ultrasonography are preferred modalities. Treatment is operative because of complications of splenic infarction and possible splenectomy. Splenopexy is the treatment of choice for a noninfarcted wandering spleen. Splenectomy should be done only when there is no evidence of splenic blood flow after detorsion of the spleen. We review our experience with wandering spleen in two pediatric patients, one treated with splenopexy and the other with splenectomy.

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